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Open AccessArticle

Tools for Wellbeing-Supportive Design: Features, Characteristics, and Prototypes

1
Design Lab, Sydney School of Architecture, Design and Planning, University of Sydney, 2006 Sydney, Australia
2
Dyson School of Design Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 1AL, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2020, 4(3), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti4030040
Received: 7 May 2020 / Revised: 2 July 2020 / Accepted: 6 July 2020 / Published: 10 July 2020
While research on wellbeing within Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an active space, a gap between research and practice persists. To tackle this, we sought to identify the practical needs of designers in taking wellbeing research into practice. We report on 15 semi-structured interviews with designers from four continents, yielding insights into design tool use generally and requirements for wellbeing design tools specifically. We then present five resulting design tool concepts, two of which were further developed into prototypes and tested in a workshop with 34 interaction design and HCI professionals. Findings include seven desirable features and three desirable characteristics for wellbeing-supportive design tools, including that these tools should satisfy the need for proof, buy-in, and tangibility. We also provide clarity around the notion of design for wellbeing and why it must be distinguished from design for positive emotions. View Full-Text
Keywords: design for wellbeing; wellbeing-supportive design; design tools; toolkit; positive computing; positive technology; responsible design design for wellbeing; wellbeing-supportive design; design tools; toolkit; positive computing; positive technology; responsible design
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Peters, D.; Ahmadpour, N.; Calvo, R.A. Tools for Wellbeing-Supportive Design: Features, Characteristics, and Prototypes. Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2020, 4, 40.

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