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Understanding the Neighborhood Concentration of Affluent Black Households in the 1990s

Department of Geography, Geology and Planning, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO 65897, USA
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3010006
Received: 15 November 2018 / Revised: 22 December 2018 / Accepted: 27 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
This study examines the intersection of race, class, and place by exploring the neighborhood concentration of affluent black households in the United States during the 1990s using Census 2000 data. It adds to the literature seeking a more nuanced understanding of the black community. The author assesses the theories of spatial assimilation and place stratification in understanding the processes associated with the neighborhood-level concentration of affluent black households. Regression analyses reveal that, in general, such concentrations are positively associated with black neighborhood socioeconomic status and negatively associated with white status. Furthermore, neighborhood quality and demographic factors are important for understanding the geography of affluent black households. Additionally, the metropolitan characteristics of residential segregation, racial composition, and regional location affect the neighborhood concentration of affluent black households. Findings suggest place stratification theory provides greater explanatory power than spatial assimilation theory for understanding the neighborhood concentration of affluent black households. View Full-Text
Keywords: black household affluence; spatial assimilation; place stratification; residential segregation; neighborhood; negative binomial regression black household affluence; spatial assimilation; place stratification; residential segregation; neighborhood; negative binomial regression
MDPI and ACS Style

Malega, R. Understanding the Neighborhood Concentration of Affluent Black Households in the 1990s. Urban Sci. 2019, 3, 6.

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