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Open AccessConcept Paper

Integrating a City’s Existing Infrastructure Vulnerabilities and Carbon Footprint for Achieving City-Wide Sustainability and Resilience Goals

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WISRD, LLC, Arvada, CO 80001, USA
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LEIF, LLC, Arvada, CO 80001, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Urban Sci. 2018, 2(3), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030053
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 15 June 2018 / Accepted: 24 June 2018 / Published: 25 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Disaster and Recovery)
Cities are setting both sustainability and resilience goals that recognize the significant pressures that cities will face over the coming decades due to increasing global populations, aging infrastructure, and hazards posed by climate change. To further help cities reach and meet this broad range of goals, the World Bank recently released the Urban Sustainability Framework in early 2018 as a framework for achieving an intelligent growth scenario, with a key recommendation of calls for the more efficient use of existing infrastructure. Albeit a prudent course, the first step in adding more stress to existing infrastructure requires a baseline cross-sector examination as to the existing daily reliability, age of assets, and other vulnerabilities regarding climate change. This examination of the inherent reliability of a city’s infrastructure systems then becomes the foundation for prioritizing projects in the capital investment planning process. However, to better integrate cross-silo priorities, new key performance indicators are required to better connect existing infrastructure vulnerabilities to a city’s carbon footprint and move towards synchronizing climate action and capital investment planning priorities to better represent intelligent growth and resource use. View Full-Text
Keywords: GHG-IV; IICIP; urban sustainability framework; capital investment planning; GPC GHG-IV; IICIP; urban sustainability framework; capital investment planning; GPC
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MDPI and ACS Style

Reiner, M.; Pelton, R.; Fang, A. Integrating a City’s Existing Infrastructure Vulnerabilities and Carbon Footprint for Achieving City-Wide Sustainability and Resilience Goals. Urban Sci. 2018, 2, 53. https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030053

AMA Style

Reiner M, Pelton R, Fang A. Integrating a City’s Existing Infrastructure Vulnerabilities and Carbon Footprint for Achieving City-Wide Sustainability and Resilience Goals. Urban Science. 2018; 2(3):53. https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030053

Chicago/Turabian Style

Reiner, Mark; Pelton, Rylie; Fang, Andrew. 2018. "Integrating a City’s Existing Infrastructure Vulnerabilities and Carbon Footprint for Achieving City-Wide Sustainability and Resilience Goals" Urban Sci. 2, no. 3: 53. https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci2030053

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