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Breathing Signature as Vitality Score Index Created by Exercises of Qigong: Implications of Artificial Intelligence Tools Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine

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School of Physical Training and Physical Therapy, Shenzhen University, 3688 Nanhai Avenue, Nanshan District, Shenzhen 518060, China
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Center of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, 3688 Nanhai Avenue, Nanshan District, Shenzhen 518060, China
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Neuroscience Institute, Children’s Hospital of Orange County, Gamma Knife Center of Southern California, Department of Neurosurgery, University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, Orange, CA 92612, USA
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School of Social Ecology, University of California-Irvine, 5300 Social and Behavioral Sciences Gateway, Irvine, CA 92697-7050, USA
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AB Sciex, Inc., Danaher Corporation, 250 South Kraemer Boulevard, Brea, CA 92821-6232, USA
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CHOC Children’s Research Institute, Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), 1201 W. La Veta Ave., Orange, CA 92868-3874, USA
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Neuro-Oncology and Stem Cell Research Laboratory (NSCL), CHOC Children’s Research Institute (CCRI), Children’s Hospital of Orange County (CHOC), 1201 W. La Veta Ave., Orange, CA 92868-3874, USA
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Department of Neurology, University of California-Irvine (UCI) School of Medicine, 200 S Manchester Ave Ste 206, Orange, CA 92868, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(4), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4040071
Received: 4 September 2019 / Revised: 15 October 2019 / Accepted: 27 November 2019 / Published: 3 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Kinesiology and Biomechanics)
Rising concerns about the short- and long-term detrimental consequences of administration of conventional pharmacopeia are fueling the search for alternative, complementary, personalized, and comprehensive approaches to human healthcare. Qigong, a form of Traditional Chinese Medicine, represents a viable alternative approach. Here, we started with the practical, philosophical, and psychological background of Ki (in Japanese) or Qi (in Chinese) and their relationship to Qigong theory and clinical application. Noting the drawbacks of the current state of Qigong clinic, herein we propose that to manage the unique aspects of the Eastern ‘non-linearity’ and ‘holistic’ approach, it needs to be integrated with the Western “linearity” “one-direction” approach. This is done through developing the concepts of “Qigong breathing signatures,” which can define our life breathing patterns associated with diseases using machine learning technology. We predict that this can be achieved by establishing an artificial intelligence (AI)-Medicine training camp of databases, which will integrate Qigong-like breathing patterns with different pathologies unique to individuals. Such an integrated connection will allow the AI-Medicine algorithm to identify breathing patterns and guide medical intervention. This unique view of potentially connecting Eastern Medicine and Western Technology can further add a novel insight to our current understanding of both Western and Eastern medicine, thereby establishing a vitality score index (VSI) that can predict the outcomes of lifestyle behaviors and medical conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: Qigong; breathing signature; vitality score index; AI Medicine; AI deep learning; immune; inflammation; tissue microenvironment; holistic care; telomerase activity; traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) Qigong; breathing signature; vitality score index; AI Medicine; AI deep learning; immune; inflammation; tissue microenvironment; holistic care; telomerase activity; traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)
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Zhang, J.; Su, Q.; Loudon, W.G.; Lee, K.L.; Luo, J.; Dethlefs, B.A.; Li, S.C. Breathing Signature as Vitality Score Index Created by Exercises of Qigong: Implications of Artificial Intelligence Tools Used in Traditional Chinese Medicine. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4, 71.

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