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Open AccessArticle

Interfacial Crystallization within Liquid Marbles

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Chemical Engineering Department, Engineering Faculty, Ariel University, P.O. Box 3, Ariel 407000, Israel
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Industrial Engineering and Management Department, Engineering Faculty, Ariel University, P.O. Box 3, Ariel 40700, Israel
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Condens. Matter 2020, 5(4), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/condmat5040062
Received: 25 September 2020 / Revised: 30 September 2020 / Accepted: 12 October 2020 / Published: 15 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Surface and Interfaces)
We report interfacial crystallization in the droplets of saline solutions placed on superhydrophobic surfaces and liquid marbles filled with the saline. Evaporation of saline droplets deposited on superhydrophobic surface resulted in the formation of cup-shaped millimeter-scaled residues. The formation of the cup-like deposit is reasonably explained within the framework of the theory of the coffee-stain effect, namely, the rate of heterogeneous crystallization along the contact line of the droplet is significantly higher than in the droplet bulk. Crystallization within evaporated saline marbles coated with lycopodium particles depends strongly on the evaporation rate. Rapidly evaporated saline marbles yielded dented shells built of a mixture of colloidal particles and NaCl crystals. We relate the formation of these shells to the interfacial crystallization promoted by hydrophobic particles coating the marbles, accompanied with the upward convection flows supplying the saline to the particles, serving as the centers of interfacial crystallization. Convective flows prevail over the diffusion mass transport for the saline marbles heated from below.
Keywords: interfacial crystallization; liquid marble; hydrophobic particle; superhydrophobic surface; coffee-stain effect interfacial crystallization; liquid marble; hydrophobic particle; superhydrophobic surface; coffee-stain effect
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bormashenko, E.; Roy, P.K.; Shoval, S.; Legchenkova, I. Interfacial Crystallization within Liquid Marbles. Condens. Matter 2020, 5, 62.

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