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Article

A “Strong” Approach to Sustainability Literacy: Embodied Ecology and Media

1
Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC V5A 1S6, Canada
2
Educational Research, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YW, UK
3
Linguistics and Cognitive Semiotics, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen, Germany
4
Faculty of Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities, Kaunas University of Technology, 44249 Kaunas, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Philosophies 2021, 6(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010014
Received: 6 January 2021 / Revised: 27 January 2021 / Accepted: 29 January 2021 / Published: 15 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in the Philosophy of Education)
This article outlines a “strong” theoretical approach to sustainability literacy, building on an earlier definition of strong and weak environmental literacy (Stables and Bishop 2001). The argument builds upon a specific semiotic approach to educational philosophy (sometimes called edusemiotics), to which these authors have been contributing. Here, we highlight how a view of learning that centers on embodied and multimodal communication invites bridging biosemiotics with critical media literacy, in pursuit of a strong, integrated sustainability literacy. The need for such a construal of literacy can be observed in recent scholarship on embodied cognition, education, media and bio/eco-semiotics. By (1) construing the environment as semiosic (Umwelt), and (2) replacing the notion of text with model, we develop a theory of literacy that understands learning as embodied/environmental in/across any mediality. As such, digital and multimedia learning are deemed to rest on environmental and embodied affordances. The notions of semiotic resources and affordances are also defined from these perspectives. We propose that a biosemiotics-informed approach to literacy, connecting both eco- and critical-media literacy, accompanies a much broader scope of meaning-making than has been the case in literacy studies so far. View Full-Text
Keywords: sustainability literacy; critical media literacy; biosemiotics; multimodality; embodiment sustainability literacy; critical media literacy; biosemiotics; multimodality; embodiment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Campbell, C.; Lacković, N.; Olteanu, A. A “Strong” Approach to Sustainability Literacy: Embodied Ecology and Media. Philosophies 2021, 6, 14. https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010014

AMA Style

Campbell C, Lacković N, Olteanu A. A “Strong” Approach to Sustainability Literacy: Embodied Ecology and Media. Philosophies. 2021; 6(1):14. https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010014

Chicago/Turabian Style

Campbell, Cary, Nataša Lacković, and Alin Olteanu. 2021. "A “Strong” Approach to Sustainability Literacy: Embodied Ecology and Media" Philosophies 6, no. 1: 14. https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies6010014

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