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Affective Embodiment and the Transmission of Affect in Ex Machina

Department of Foreign Languages, National Sun Yet-sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan
Philosophies 2019, 4(3), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies4030053
Received: 28 June 2019 / Revised: 26 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 6 September 2019
The focus of posthuman thought centers on a shift in the humanistic paradigm; focusing on a state of existence that lies beyond being “human”, including bioengineering, artificial intelligence, and synthetic embodiment. Inspired by continuous breakthroughs in the research and creation of artificial intelligence, science fiction has moved beyond the realm of portraying artificial intelligence that is capable of conscious thought to speculate upon a future creation of machines that feel, and initiate feeling in return. The influence of posthuman discourse is prevalent in science fiction film narratives and demonstrates a heavy emphasis on the deconstruction of humanity’s belief in our unique emotional capabilities. This paper draws upon Alex Garland’s 2015 original film and screenplay Ex Machina as textual reference to explore posthuman prospects in AI by envisioning possibilities where emotional capacity no longer separates humans and machines. In a world where artificial intelligence could be given artificial life, how is affect addressed, and redressed? This paper argues the importance of affective embodiment and material experiences in AI that shape the future of posthuman becoming. View Full-Text
Keywords: affect; affective embodiment; artificial consciousness; posthumanism; new materialism; becoming affect; affective embodiment; artificial consciousness; posthumanism; new materialism; becoming
MDPI and ACS Style

Fahn, C.W. Affective Embodiment and the Transmission of Affect in Ex Machina. Philosophies 2019, 4, 53.

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