Next Article in Journal
A JND-Based Pixel-Domain Algorithm and Hardware Architecture for Perceptual Image Coding
Next Article in Special Issue
Methods for Assessment and Monitoring of Light Pollution around Ecologically Sensitive Sites
Previous Article in Journal
Degraded Historical Document Binarization: A Review on Issues, Challenges, Techniques, and Future Directions
Previous Article in Special Issue
Beyond All-Sky: Assessing Ecological Light Pollution Using Multi-Spectral Full-Sphere Fisheye Lens Imaging
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Evaluating Human Photoreceptoral Inputs from Night-Time Lights Using RGB Imaging Photometry

1
Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK
2
Departamento de Física de la Tierra y Astrofísica, Instituto de Física de Partículas y del Cosmos (IPARCOS), Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid, Spain
3
Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Glorieta de la Astronomía, s/n, C.P.18008 Granada, Spain
4
Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain
5
Physics Department, CEGEP de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1E 4K1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Imaging 2019, 5(4), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/jimaging5040049
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution Assessment with Imaging Devices)
  |  
PDF [2118 KB, uploaded 17 April 2019]
  |     |  

Abstract

Night-time lights interact with human physiology through different pathways starting at the retinal layers of the eye; from the signals provided by the rods; the S-, L- and M-cones; and the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC). These individual photic channels combine in complex ways to modulate important physiological processes, among them the daily entrainment of the neural master oscillator that regulates circadian rhythms. Evaluating the relative excitation of each type of photoreceptor generally requires full knowledge of the spectral power distribution of the incoming light, information that is not easily available in many practical applications. One such instance is wide area sensing of public outdoor lighting; present-day radiometers onboard Earth-orbiting platforms with sufficient nighttime sensitivity are generally panchromatic and lack the required spectral discrimination capacity. In this paper, we show that RGB imagery acquired with off-the-shelf digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR) can be a useful tool to evaluate, with reasonable accuracy and high angular resolution, the photoreceptoral inputs associated with a wide range of lamp technologies. The method is based on linear regressions of these inputs against optimum combinations of the associated R, G, and B signals, built for a large set of artificial light sources by means of synthetic photometry. Given the widespread use of RGB imaging devices, this approach is expected to facilitate the monitoring of the physiological effects of light pollution, from ground and space alike, using standard imaging technology. View Full-Text
Keywords: light pollution; imaging; artificial light at night; night-time lights; DSLR cameras; RGB sensors; non-visual effects of light; circadian phototransduction light pollution; imaging; artificial light at night; night-time lights; DSLR cameras; RGB sensors; non-visual effects of light; circadian phototransduction
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Bará, S.; Aubé, M.; Cardiel, N.; Tapia, C.E.; Zamorano, J.; Gaston, K.J. Evaluating Human Photoreceptoral Inputs from Night-Time Lights Using RGB Imaging Photometry. J. Imaging 2019, 5, 49.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
J. Imaging EISSN 2313-433X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top