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Article

Productivity Analysis and Employment Effects of Marigold Cultivation in Jammu, India

1
Department of Agricultural Economics, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Haryana 125004, India
2
Division of Agricultural Economics & ABM, Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences & Technology, Jammu 180009, India
3
Institute of Development Research and Development Policy, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44805 Bochum, Germany
4
Centre for Studies on European Economy, Azerbaijan State University of Economics (UNEC), Baku AZ1001, Azerbaijan
5
CED—Center for Economic Development and Social Change, 80128 Naples, Italy
6
Division of Agricultural Extension Education, Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences & Technology, Jammu 180009, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Christian Fischer
Horticulturae 2022, 8(3), 263; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8030263
Received: 15 February 2022 / Revised: 13 March 2022 / Accepted: 15 March 2022 / Published: 18 March 2022
The present study addresses the potential of marigold cultivation in terms of income and employment effects in the subtropical region of Jammu. Within the field research, we have surveyed 100 marigold farmers from Jammu and Kathua districts of Jammu Region. The region is of special interest in terms of economic development due to disproportional unemployment rate and high level of poverty. The study finds that marigold cultivation exhibits strong employment and income linkages. Marigold cultivation generates employment opportunities of 124.84 man-days (MD) in a season in comparison to 85.37 MD of rice and 49.58 MDs of wheat. Hence, marigold farming could create more and better-paid rural employment possibilities for peasants and lead to a substantial reduction of the poverty headcount ratios. Furthermore, the Cobb–Douglas production function-based econometric specification shows that farmyard manure (FYM), fertilizers, plant protection, and machine hours have a statistically significant positive effect on marigold yield. The second source of the growth of marigold cultivation is the replacement of subsistence farming with a focus on wheat and rice by marigold farming. We find that this kind of growth does not endanger food security in Jammu and Kathua districts. On the contrary, the growing level of income of the rural population could enhance market demand and a greater willingness to pay for the local agri-food sector and assure a greater level of food security. View Full-Text
Keywords: censored regression; Cobb–Douglas production function; marigold cultivation; rural employment censored regression; Cobb–Douglas production function; marigold cultivation; rural employment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kaur, M.; Bhat, A.; Sadik-Zada, E.R.; Sharma, R. Productivity Analysis and Employment Effects of Marigold Cultivation in Jammu, India. Horticulturae 2022, 8, 263. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8030263

AMA Style

Kaur M, Bhat A, Sadik-Zada ER, Sharma R. Productivity Analysis and Employment Effects of Marigold Cultivation in Jammu, India. Horticulturae. 2022; 8(3):263. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8030263

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kaur, Manpreet, Anil Bhat, Elkhan Richard Sadik-Zada, and Rakesh Sharma. 2022. "Productivity Analysis and Employment Effects of Marigold Cultivation in Jammu, India" Horticulturae 8, no. 3: 263. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8030263

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