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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Use and Effects of Different Brassica and Other Rotation Crops on Soilborne Diseases and Yield of Potato

1
New England Plant, Soil, and Water Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Orono, ME 04469, USA
2
The Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME 04609, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Horticulturae 2018, 4(4), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae4040037
Received: 29 September 2018 / Revised: 20 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 30 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Horticultural Plant Pathology and Prevention)
Soilborne diseases are persistent problems in potato production, resulting in reductions in tuber quality and yield. Brassica rotation crops may reduce soilborne potato diseases, but how to best utilize Brassica crops in potato cropping systems has not been established. In this research, two two-year trials were established at three different sites with histories of soilborne diseases, and up to six different Brassica crops (canola, winter rapeseed, yellow and brown condiment mustards, oriental mustard, oilseed radish, and a mustard blend) and standard rotation crops (ryegrass and buckwheat) were evaluated as rotation and green manure crops. Tuber yield did not vary substantially among the rotation crops, but rotation treatments significantly affected incidence and severity of soilborne diseases at all sites. However, results were variable among sites and years. Perennial ryegrass and mustard blend rotations reduced powdery scab disease by 31–55% relative to other rotations in the only field where powdery scab was a serious problem. Mustard blend, ryegrass, and other Brassica rotations also reduced common scab, silver scurf, and black scurf at various sites, but not consistently at all sites. At one site, mustard blend and barley/ryegrass rotations reduced black scurf (by 21–58%) and common scab (by 13–34%) relative to no rotation. Overall, disease control was not correlated with biofumigation potential or rotation crop biomass production. Although both Brassica and non-Brassica rotations provided disease reduction in potato cropping systems, no single rotation crop performed consistently better than several others. View Full-Text
Keywords: Solanum tuberosum; Brassica spp.; crop rotation; green manure; black scurf; common scab; powdery scab; mustard; ryegrass Solanum tuberosum; Brassica spp.; crop rotation; green manure; black scurf; common scab; powdery scab; mustard; ryegrass
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Larkin, R.P.; Lynch, R.P. Use and Effects of Different Brassica and Other Rotation Crops on Soilborne Diseases and Yield of Potato . Horticulturae 2018, 4, 37.

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