Next Article in Journal
Nosema Disease of European Honey Bees
Next Article in Special Issue
Discovery and Extrolite Production of Three New Species of Talaromyces Belonging to Sections Helici and Purpurei from Freshwater in Korea
Previous Article in Journal
Biotechnological Importance of Torulaspora delbrueckii: From the Obscurity to the Spotlight
Previous Article in Special Issue
Five Novel Taxa from Freshwater Habitats and New Taxonomic Insights of Pleurotheciales and Savoryellomycetidae
Article

Genetic Analyses of Saprolegnia Strains Isolated from Salmonid Fish of Different Geographic Origin Document the Connection between Pathogenicity and Molecular Diversity

1
Division of Biotechnology and Plant Health, Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), N-1431 Ås, Norway
2
Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Pb 64, N-1431 Ås, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Co first authorship.
Academic Editors: Samantha C. Karunarathna and Saowaluck Tibpromma
J. Fungi 2021, 7(9), 713; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7090713
Received: 10 August 2021 / Revised: 27 August 2021 / Accepted: 29 August 2021 / Published: 30 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diversity and Classification of Environmental Fungi)
Saprolegnia parasitica is recognized as one of the most important oomycetes pests of salmon and trout species. The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and method sequence data of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) were used to study the genetic diversity and relationships of Saprolegnia spp. collected from Canada, Chile, Japan, Norway and Scotland. AFLP analysis of 37 Saprolegnia spp. isolates using six primer combinations gave a total of 163 clear polymorphic bands. Bayesian cluster analysis using genetic similarity divided the isolates into three main groups, suggesting that there are genetic relationships among the isolates. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and principal coordinate analysis (PCO) confirmed the pattern of the cluster analyses. ITS analyses of 48 Saprolegnia sequences resulted in five well-defined clades. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed greater variation within countries (91.01%) than among countries (8.99%). We were able to distinguish the Saprolegnia isolates according to their species, ability to produce oogonia with and without long spines on the cysts and their ability to or not to cause mortality in salmonids. AFLP markers and ITS sequencing data obtained in the study, were found to be an efficient tool to characterize the genetic diversity and relationships of Saprolegnia spp. The comparison of AFLP analysis and ITS sequence data using the Mantel test showed a very high and significant correlation (r2 = 0.8317). View Full-Text
Keywords: AFLP; fingerprinting; genetic diversity; ITS; origin; salmon AFLP; fingerprinting; genetic diversity; ITS; origin; salmon
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Elameen, A.; Stueland, S.; Kristensen, R.; Fristad, R.F.; Vrålstad, T.; Skaar, I. Genetic Analyses of Saprolegnia Strains Isolated from Salmonid Fish of Different Geographic Origin Document the Connection between Pathogenicity and Molecular Diversity. J. Fungi 2021, 7, 713. https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7090713

AMA Style

Elameen A, Stueland S, Kristensen R, Fristad RF, Vrålstad T, Skaar I. Genetic Analyses of Saprolegnia Strains Isolated from Salmonid Fish of Different Geographic Origin Document the Connection between Pathogenicity and Molecular Diversity. Journal of Fungi. 2021; 7(9):713. https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7090713

Chicago/Turabian Style

Elameen, Abdelhameed, Svein Stueland, Ralf Kristensen, Rosa F. Fristad, Trude Vrålstad, and Ida Skaar. 2021. "Genetic Analyses of Saprolegnia Strains Isolated from Salmonid Fish of Different Geographic Origin Document the Connection between Pathogenicity and Molecular Diversity" Journal of Fungi 7, no. 9: 713. https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7090713

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop