Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
The Importance of Telomere Shortening for Atherosclerosis and Mortality
Previous Article in Journal
Early Embryonic Expression of AP-2α Is Critical for Cardiovascular Development
Previous Article in Special Issue
Why Some Patients Undergoing Lipoprotein Apheresis Therapy Develop New Cardiovascular Events?
Article

Triglycerides to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Predicts Chronic Renal Disease in Patients without Diabetes Mellitus (STELLA Study)

1
. Department of Nephrology, Doctors’ Hospital, 26 Kefallinias, Athens 11257, Greece
2
Department of Nuclear Medicine, General Hospital “LAΪKO”, Athens 11527, Greece
3
Department of of Bariatric Surgery, Doctors’ Hospital, 26 Kefallinias, Athens 11257, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2020, 7(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd7030028
Received: 10 June 2020 / Revised: 11 July 2020 / Accepted: 27 July 2020 / Published: 1 August 2020
Background: The triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio has been included in the potential indices for atherosclerosis in chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we addressed the role of the TG/HDL-C ratio on CKD prediction defined by both classified estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and classified urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) in non-diabetic participants. Methods: One hundred and eighty-three subjects with a mean age 67.3 ± 15.6 years old were included. Our participants were classified in both eGFR and UACR categories according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes 2012 criteria. Estimated pulse wave velocity (ePWV) was calculated using an equation from age and mean blood pressure. The TG/HDL-C ratio was calculated. X2 tests and adjusted models were applied using confounders. Results: The TG/HDL-C ratio was inversely associated with eGFR and positively with both UACR and ePWV. We divided our patients in two groups according to the found ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C ratio cut-off point, either with an eGFR of less or more than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. X2 tests showed significant association between the high TG/HDL-C ratio and classified eGFR, and classified UACR and hypertension (x2 = 24.5, p = 0.001, x2 = 12.5, p = 0.002 and x2 = 12.6, p = 0.001, respectively). The adjusted model showed the high TG/HDL-C ratio to be an independent predictor for both a low eGFR and UACR (OR = 1.5, 1.2–1.9 and OR = 1.22, 1.02–1.47, respectively) in combination with old age and hypertension. Conclusion: The TG/HDL-C ratio was revealed to be a potential predictor for both a low eGFR and micro/macroalbuminuria in non-diabetic patients. The arterial stiffening was included in the main underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: TG/HDL-C ratio; estimated pulse wave velocity; albuminuria; renal disease; hypertension TG/HDL-C ratio; estimated pulse wave velocity; albuminuria; renal disease; hypertension
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Raikou, V.D.; Kyriaki, D.; Gavriil, S. Triglycerides to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Predicts Chronic Renal Disease in Patients without Diabetes Mellitus (STELLA Study). J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2020, 7, 28. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd7030028

AMA Style

Raikou VD, Kyriaki D, Gavriil S. Triglycerides to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Predicts Chronic Renal Disease in Patients without Diabetes Mellitus (STELLA Study). Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease. 2020; 7(3):28. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd7030028

Chicago/Turabian Style

Raikou, Vaia D., Despina Kyriaki, and Sotiris Gavriil. 2020. "Triglycerides to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Predicts Chronic Renal Disease in Patients without Diabetes Mellitus (STELLA Study)" Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease 7, no. 3: 28. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd7030028

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop