Next Article in Journal
Factors Associated with Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Subgroup Analysis from a Telemergency Service
Previous Article in Journal
Development of the Self-Assessment Self-Disclosure Questionnaire to Examine the Association between Self-Disclosure and Frailty among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan
 
 
Font Type:
Arial Georgia Verdana
Font Size:
Aa Aa Aa
Line Spacing:
Column Width:
Background:
This is an early access version, the complete PDF, HTML, and XML versions will be available soon.
Article

Relationship between Subjective Grip Strength and Physical Functioning among Community-Dwelling Older Women

1
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Science, Kobe International University, Kobe 658-0032, Japan
2
Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kyoto Tachibana University, Kyoto 607-8175, Japan
3
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kyoto Tachibana University, Kyoto 607-8175, Japan
4
Koka City Health and Welfare Department, Community Coexistence Promotion Division, koka 528-8502, Japan
5
Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Kansai University of Welfare Sciences, Osaka 582-0026, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geriatrics 2024, 9(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics9030068
Submission received: 9 April 2024 / Revised: 16 May 2024 / Accepted: 22 May 2024 / Published: 26 May 2024

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between subjective grip strength and physical function in community-dwelling older women. Subjective grip strength was assessed using a questionnaire, and physical function and body composition were compared between groups with strong and weak subjective grip strength. Additionally, the two groups were compared in those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and those with normal cognitive function, respectively. The results showed significant differences in grip strength (p < 0.001), 30 s chair–stand (CS-30) test (p = 0.039), timed up-and-go (TUG) test (p = 0.027), maximal gait speed (p = 0.029), and skeletal muscle mass (p < 0.001). Older adults with normal cognitive function showed significant differences in grip strength (p < 0.001), quadriceps muscle strength (p < 0.009), one-leg standing time (p = 0.041), CS-30 (p = 0.002), TUG (p = 0.014), gait speed (p = 0.006), and skeletal muscle mass (p = 0.003). Older adults with low subjective grip strength had lower physical function and skeletal muscle mass. However, no items showed significant differences between groups among older adults with MCI. Thus, subjective grip strength is an indicator of an overall decline in physical function and a reduction in skeletal muscle mass in older adults, and cognitive function should be considered when assessing subjective grip strength in older adults.
Keywords: older adults; subjective motor ability; subjective grip strength; physical function; cognitive function older adults; subjective motor ability; subjective grip strength; physical function; cognitive function

Share and Cite

MDPI and ACS Style

Iwamoto, K.; Kikuchi, Y.; Nakano, H.; Katsurasako, T.; Mori, K.; Shiraiwa, K.; Horie, J.; Murata, S. Relationship between Subjective Grip Strength and Physical Functioning among Community-Dwelling Older Women. Geriatrics 2024, 9, 68. https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics9030068

AMA Style

Iwamoto K, Kikuchi Y, Nakano H, Katsurasako T, Mori K, Shiraiwa K, Horie J, Murata S. Relationship between Subjective Grip Strength and Physical Functioning among Community-Dwelling Older Women. Geriatrics. 2024; 9(3):68. https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics9030068

Chicago/Turabian Style

Iwamoto, Kohei, Yuki Kikuchi, Hideki Nakano, Tsuyoshi Katsurasako, Kohei Mori, Kayoko Shiraiwa, Jun Horie, and Shin Murata. 2024. "Relationship between Subjective Grip Strength and Physical Functioning among Community-Dwelling Older Women" Geriatrics 9, no. 3: 68. https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics9030068

Article Metrics

Back to TopTop