Next Article in Journal
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Publications in 2018
Previous Article in Journal
Open Access and the Library
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

How Efficiently Do Elite US Universities Produce Highly Cited Papers?

1
Ifo Institute, Poschingerstr. 5, 81679 Munich, Germany
2
CSIC, Institute of Public Goods and Policies (IPP) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas C/Albasanz, 26-28 28037 Madrid, Spain
3
Division for Science and Innovation Studies, Administrative Headquarters of the Max Planck Society Hofgartenstr. 8, 80539 Munich, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Publications 2019, 7(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/publications7010004
Received: 2 October 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
While output and impact assessments were initially at the forefront of institutional research evaluations, efficiency measurements have become popular in recent years. Research efficiency is measured by indicators that relate research output to input. The additional consideration of research input in research evaluation is obvious, since the output depends on the input. The present study is based on a comprehensive dataset with input and output data for 50 US universities. As input, we used research expenses, and as output the number of highly-cited papers. We employed Data Efficiency Analysis (DEA), Free Disposal Hull (FDH) and two more robust models: the order-m and order-α approaches. The results of the DEA and FDH analysis show that Harvard University and Boston College can be called especially efficient compared to the other universities. While the strength of Harvard University lies in its high output of highly-cited papers, the strength of Boston College is its small input. In the order-α and order-m frameworks, Harvard University remains efficient, but Boston College becomes super-efficient. We produced university rankings based on adjusted efficiency scores (subsequent to regression analyses), in which single covariates (e.g., the disciplinary profile) are held constant. View Full-Text
Keywords: university; efficiency analysis; partial frontier analysis; regression analysis; normalized citation impact university; efficiency analysis; partial frontier analysis; regression analysis; normalized citation impact
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Wohlrabe, K.; de Moya Anegon, F.; Bornmann, L. How Efficiently Do Elite US Universities Produce Highly Cited Papers? Publications 2019, 7, 4.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop