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Article

Assessment of Screening for Nasal Obstruction among Sleep Dentistry Outpatients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

1
Division of Oral Health Science, Department of Oral Function and Rehabilitation, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8587, Japan
2
Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8587, Japan
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Department of Internal Medicine, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8587, Japan
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Faculty of Law, Seiwa University, Kisarazu City, Chiba 292-8555, Japan
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Sleep Research Group, Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
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Sydney School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dent. J. 2020, 8(4), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8040119
Received: 14 September 2020 / Revised: 6 October 2020 / Accepted: 9 October 2020 / Published: 14 October 2020
Oral appliances (OA), a common treatment modality for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), are not suitable for patients with nasal obstruction. Rhinomanometry, the gold standard technique to assess nasal airway resistance, is not readily available in sleep dentistry clinics. We demonstrate the use of a portable lightweight peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) rate meter to objectively assess nasal airflow and utilized the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale to subjectively assess nasal obstruction in 97 patients with OSA and 105 healthy controls. We examined the correlations between the following variables between the groups: demographics, body mass index, PNIF, NOSE scale scores, apnea–hypopnea index (AHI), minimum SpO2 (SpO2min), Mallampati classification, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores. Patients with OSA had significantly lower PNIF values and higher NOSE scores than controls. In the patient group, PNIF was not significantly correlated with AHI, SpO2min, Mallampati classification, or NOSE or ESS scores. Lower PNIF values and higher NOSE scores suggested impaired nasal airflow in the OSA group. As daytime PNIF measurement bears no relationship to AHI, this cannot be used alone in predicting the suitability of treatment for OSA with OA but can be used as an adjunct for making clinical decisions. View Full-Text
Keywords: apnea–hypopnea index; Mallampati classification; mandibular advancement devices; nasal obstruction; sleep apnea; obstructive apnea–hypopnea index; Mallampati classification; mandibular advancement devices; nasal obstruction; sleep apnea; obstructive
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sawa, A.; Suzuki, H.; Niwa, H.; Oguchi, S.; Yagi, T.; Iwata, Y.; Makiyama, Y.; Chow, C.M.; Komiyama, O. Assessment of Screening for Nasal Obstruction among Sleep Dentistry Outpatients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Dent. J. 2020, 8, 119. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8040119

AMA Style

Sawa A, Suzuki H, Niwa H, Oguchi S, Yagi T, Iwata Y, Makiyama Y, Chow CM, Komiyama O. Assessment of Screening for Nasal Obstruction among Sleep Dentistry Outpatients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Dentistry Journal. 2020; 8(4):119. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8040119

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sawa, Arisa, Hiroshi Suzuki, Hideo Niwa, Sumito Oguchi, Tatsuo Yagi, Yoshihiro Iwata, Yasuhide Makiyama, Chin M. Chow, and Osamu Komiyama. 2020. "Assessment of Screening for Nasal Obstruction among Sleep Dentistry Outpatients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea" Dentistry Journal 8, no. 4: 119. https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8040119

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