Next Article in Journal
Nursing Perspective of the Humanized Care of the Neonate and Family: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
“Girls Aren’t Meant to Exercise”: Perceived Influences on Physical Activity among Adolescent Girls—The HERizon Project
Article

Children’s Perspectives on Outpatient Physician Visits: Capturing a Missing Voice in Patient-Centered Care

1
Department of Psychology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
2
McMaster Children’s Hospital, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada
3
Department of Paediatrics, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
4
Children’s Health Research Institute, London, ON N6C 2V5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Children 2021, 8(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/children8010034
Received: 23 November 2020 / Revised: 21 December 2020 / Accepted: 30 December 2020 / Published: 7 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Integrative Pediatrics)
Actively involving children in their healthcare is a core value of patient-centered care. This is the first study to directly obtain children’s detailed perspectives on positive and negative aspects of outpatient physician visits in a primary care setting (e.g., checkups) and their preferred level of participation. Individual interviews were conducted with 167 children (female n = 82, male n = 85; ages 7–10, Mage = 8.07 years, SD = 0.82). Open-ended questions were used so that children’s responses were not confined to researchers’ assumptions, followed by close-ended questions to meet specific objectives. Quantitative content analysis, correlations, logistic regression, and Cochran’s Q were used to explore the data. Children were highly fearful of needle procedures (61%), blood draws (73%), pain (45%), and the unknown (21%). Children indicated that they liked receiving rewards (32%) and improving their health (16%). Children who were more fearful during physician visits wanted more preparatory information (ExpB = 1.05, Waldx2(1) = 9.11, p = 0.003, McFadden’s R22 = 0.07) and more participation during the visit (ExpB = 1.04, Waldx2(1) = 5.88, p = 0.015, McFadden’s R22 = 0.03). Our results can inform efforts to promote positive physician visit experiences for children, reduce procedural distress, and foster children’s ability to take an active role in managing their health. View Full-Text
Keywords: physician; primary care; children; patient participation; patient-centered care physician; primary care; children; patient participation; patient-centered care
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Dalley, J.S.; Morrongiello, B.A.; McMurtry, C.M. Children’s Perspectives on Outpatient Physician Visits: Capturing a Missing Voice in Patient-Centered Care. Children 2021, 8, 34. https://doi.org/10.3390/children8010034

AMA Style

Dalley JS, Morrongiello BA, McMurtry CM. Children’s Perspectives on Outpatient Physician Visits: Capturing a Missing Voice in Patient-Centered Care. Children. 2021; 8(1):34. https://doi.org/10.3390/children8010034

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dalley, Jessica S., Barbara A. Morrongiello, and C. M. McMurtry 2021. "Children’s Perspectives on Outpatient Physician Visits: Capturing a Missing Voice in Patient-Centered Care" Children 8, no. 1: 34. https://doi.org/10.3390/children8010034

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop