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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Older Adults’ Perceptions of ICT: Main Findings from the Technology In Later Life (TILL) Study

1
Health and Wellbeing Priority Research Area, School of Health, Wellbeing and Social Care, The Open University, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire Milton Keynes MK7 6BJ, UK
2
Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies, University of Regina, Regina, SK S4S 0A2, Canada
3
Faculty of Nursing, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC V2N 4Z9, Canada
4
Centre for Innovative Ageing, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2019, 7(3), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7030086
Received: 3 June 2019 / Revised: 28 June 2019 / Accepted: 30 June 2019 / Published: 4 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Creating Age-friendly Communities: Housing and Technology)
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Abstract

Technology is entwined in 21st Century society, and within the lives of people across all ages. The Technology In Later Life (TILL) study is the first piece of work contributing to the impact, behavior, and perception of technology use, by adults aged ≥70 years, residing in rural and suburban areas. TILL is an international, multi-centred, multi-methods study investigating and conceptualizing how various technologies impact the lives of older adults; residing in urban and rural locations in the United Kingdom (UK) and Canada. This in-depth study recruited 37 participants via a multi-methods approach. Analysis of the findings ascertained two overarching themes: facilitators of technology use (i.e., sharing of information and feeling secure), and detractors of technology (i.e., feelings of apprehension of use). Proposed recommendations include promotion of technology from a strengths-based perspective focusing on positive opportunities technology to improve health and wellbeing, creating a peer support network to assist with learning of new technology, and the need to examine further how intergenerational relationships may be enhanced through the use of technology. The distinction of these themes narrates to the originality of this initial study and milieu of recruited participants, intersecting across the fields of gerontology, geography, social sciences, and gerontechnology. View Full-Text
Keywords: technology; rural ageing; qualitative research methods; gerontechnology; privacy; intergenerational; social connectedness; community networks technology; rural ageing; qualitative research methods; gerontechnology; privacy; intergenerational; social connectedness; community networks
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Marston, H.R.; Genoe, R.; Freeman, S.; Kulczycki, C.; Musselwhite, C. Older Adults’ Perceptions of ICT: Main Findings from the Technology In Later Life (TILL) Study. Healthcare 2019, 7, 86.

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