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Technology to Support Aging in Place: Older Adults’ Perspectives

1
The Design Lab, Computer Science and Engineering, Jacobs School of Engineering, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
2
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
3
Computer Science and Engineering, Jacobs School of Engineering, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
4
Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
5
Department of Psychiatry, Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging, School of Medicine, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
6
Scalable Knowledge Intelligence, IBM Research-Almaden, San Jose, CA 95120, USA
7
The Design Lab, Center for Wireless and Population Health Systems, Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2019, 7(2), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare7020060
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 3 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Creating Age-friendly Communities: Housing and Technology)
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Abstract

The U.S. population over 65 years of age is increasing. Most older adults prefer to age in place, and technologies, including Internet of things (IoT), Ambient/Active Assisted Living (AAL) robots and other artificial intelligence (AI), can support independent living. However, a top-down design process creates mismatches between technologies and older adults’ needs. A user-centered design approach was used to identify older adults’ perspectives regarding AAL and AI technologies and gauge interest in participating in a co-design process. A survey was used to obtain demographic characteristics and assess privacy perspectives. A convenience sample of 31 retirement community residents participated in one of two 90-min focus group sessions. The semi-structured group interview solicited barriers and facilitators to technology adoption, privacy attitudes, and interest in project co-design participation to inform technology development. Focus group sessions were audiotaped and professionally transcribed. Transcripts were reviewed and coded to identify themes and patterns. Descriptive statistics were applied to the quantitative data. Identified barriers to technology use included low technology literacy, including lack of familiarity with terminology, and physical challenges, which can make adoption difficult. Facilitators included an eagerness to learn, interest in co-design, and a desire to understand and control their data. Most participants identified as privacy pragmatics and fundamentalists, indicating that privacy is important to older adults. At the same time, they also reported a willingness to contribute to the design of technologies that would facilitate aging independently. There is a need to increase technology literacy of older adults along with aging literacy of technologists. View Full-Text
Keywords: retirement community; co-design; privacy; research ethics; artificial intelligence; robots retirement community; co-design; privacy; research ethics; artificial intelligence; robots
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Wang, S.; Bolling, K.; Mao, W.; Reichstadt, J.; Jeste, D.; Kim, H.-C.; Nebeker, C. Technology to Support Aging in Place: Older Adults’ Perspectives. Healthcare 2019, 7, 60.

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