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How Neighborhood Effects Vary: Childbearing and Fathering among Latino and African American Adolescents

1
Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Anthropology, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA
2
School of Social Work, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
3
Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2018, 6(1), 7; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6010007
Received: 20 November 2017 / Revised: 29 December 2017 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 18 January 2018
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PDF [269 KB, uploaded 18 January 2018]

Abstract

This study examines what neighborhood conditions experienced at age 15 and after are associated with teen childbearing and fathering among Latino and African American youth and whether these neighborhood effects vary by gender and/or ethnicity. Administrative and survey data from a natural experiment are used for a sample of 517 Latino and African American youth whose families were quasi-randomly assigned to public housing operated by the Denver (CO) Housing Authority (DHA). Characteristics of the neighborhood initially assigned by DHA to wait list applicants are utilized as identifying instruments for the neighborhood contexts experienced during adolescence. Cox Proportional Hazards (PH) models reveal that neighborhoods having higher percentages of foreign-born residents but lower levels of social capital robustly predict reduced odds of teen parenting though the magnitude of these effects was contingent on gender and ethnicity. Specifically, the presence of foreign-born neighbors on the risk of teen parenting produced a stronger dampening effect for African American youth when compared to Latino youth. Additionally, the effects of social capital on teen parenting were stronger for males than females. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent childbearing; adolescent fathers; African Americans; emerging adulthood; Latinos; neighborhood effects adolescent childbearing; adolescent fathers; African Americans; emerging adulthood; Latinos; neighborhood effects
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Lucero, J.L.; Santiago, A.M.; Galster, G.C. How Neighborhood Effects Vary: Childbearing and Fathering among Latino and African American Adolescents. Healthcare 2018, 6, 7.

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