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Healthcare 2017, 5(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare5040064

Effects of Prenatal Tobacco and Wood-Fuel Smoke Exposure on Birth Weight in Sri Lanka

1
Department of Nursing, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, 2-746, Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8518, Japan
2
Department of Nursing, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka
3
Department of Medical Technology, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, 2-746, Asahimachi-dori, Chuo-ku, Niigata 951-8518, Japan
4
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka
5
Teaching Hospital Kurunegala, Colombo Road, Kurunegala 60000, Sri Lanka
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sampath Parthasarathy
Received: 9 August 2017 / Revised: 17 September 2017 / Accepted: 23 September 2017 / Published: 26 September 2017
Full-Text   |   PDF [467 KB, uploaded 26 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Low birth weight is a key public health problem in many developing countries, including Sri Lanka. Indoor air pollution from tobacco smoke and kitchen-fuel smoke are among the major contributors to low birth weight, factors of which there are little awareness of in Sri Lanka. We evaluated the effect of passive smoking and kitchen-fuel smoke exposure on birth weight. Seventy-six pregnant women were included in the study. Data were collected by questionnaire, and exposure assessment was conducted using a breath carbon monoxide monitor. Women exposed to second-hand tobacco smoke daily had a significantly lower mean gestational age at delivery (mean ± standard error [SE]: 38.0 ± 0.5 weeks) than women who were exposed to second-hand tobacco smoke only once a week (mean ± SE: 39.3 ± 0.3 weeks) (p < 0.05). Women who were exposed to tobacco smoke every day delivered neonates with significantly lower mean birth weight (mean ± SE: 2703 ± 135 g) than women who were only exposed once a week (mean ± SE: 3125 ± 147 g) (p < 0.05). A one-minute increase in cooking time in a kitchen without a chimney increased women’s expired air carbon monoxide concentration by 0.038 ppm (p = 0.006). Long-term exposure to wood-fuel smoke in a kitchen without a chimney can increase the risk of inhaling high concentrations of carbon monoxide. View Full-Text
Keywords: wood fuel smoke; passive smoking; birth weight; Sri Lanka wood fuel smoke; passive smoking; birth weight; Sri Lanka
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Pathirathna, M.L.; Abeywickrama, H.M.; Sekijima, K.; Sadakata, M.; Fujiwara, N.; Muramatsu, Y.; Wimalasiri, K.M.S.; Jayawardene, U.; de Silva, D.; Dematawewa, C.M.B. Effects of Prenatal Tobacco and Wood-Fuel Smoke Exposure on Birth Weight in Sri Lanka. Healthcare 2017, 5, 64.

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