Next Article in Journal
Using Technology, Bioinformatics and Health Informatics Approaches to Improve Learning Experiences in Optometry Education, Research and Practice
Previous Article in Journal
Promoting Healthy Growth or Feeding Obesity? The Need for Evidence-Based Oversight of Infant Nutritional Supplement Claims
Open AccessArticle

Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey

1
School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
2
Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
3
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
4
School of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sampath Parthasarathy
Healthcare 2016, 4(4), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare4040085
Received: 6 October 2016 / Revised: 7 November 2016 / Accepted: 10 November 2016 / Published: 14 November 2016
The prevalence of obesity is increasing. The potential for allied health professionals to intervene through the provision of lifestyle advice is unknown. This study aimed to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health professionals in the provision of dietary and physical activity advice for clients with overweight or obesity. Dietitians, exercise physiologists, nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and psychologists (n = 296) working in New South Wales were surveyed using paper-based and online methods. The majority of health professionals (71%) believed that providing weight management advice was within their scope of practice; 81% provided physical activity advice but only 57% provided dietary advice. Other than dietitians, few had received training in client weight management during their professional qualification (14%) or continuing education (16%). Providing dietary advice was associated with: believing it was within their scope of practice (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.9–7.9, p < 0.01), training during their entry-level qualification (OR 7.2, 3.2–16.4, p < 0.01) and having departmental guidelines (OR 4.7, 2.1–10.9, p < 0.01). Most health professionals are willing to provide lifestyle advice to clients with overweight or obesity but few have received required training. Developing guidelines and training for in client weight management may potentially impact on rising obesity levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: health behaviour; diet; obesity; health promotion; physical activity; allied health; weight management health behaviour; diet; obesity; health promotion; physical activity; allied health; weight management
MDPI and ACS Style

Snodgrass, S.J.; Guest, M.; Kable, A.K.; James, C.; Ashby, S.E.; Plotnikoff, R.C.; Collins, C.E. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey. Healthcare 2016, 4, 85. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare4040085

AMA Style

Snodgrass SJ, Guest M, Kable AK, James C, Ashby SE, Plotnikoff RC, Collins CE. Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey. Healthcare. 2016; 4(4):85. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare4040085

Chicago/Turabian Style

Snodgrass, Suzanne J.; Guest, Maya; Kable, Ashley K.; James, Carole; Ashby, Samantha E.; Plotnikoff, Ronald C.; Collins, Clare E. 2016. "Weight Management Advice for Clients with Overweight or Obesity: Allied Health Professional Survey" Healthcare 4, no. 4: 85. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare4040085

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop