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Article

A Participatory Sensing Study to Understand the Problems Older Adults Faced in Developing Medication-Taking Habits

1
Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California (UABC), Mexicali 21100, Mexico
2
School of Computer Science and Informatics, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 4AG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Sara Garfield and Gaby Judah
Healthcare 2022, 10(7), 1238; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071238
Received: 8 May 2022 / Revised: 20 June 2022 / Accepted: 23 June 2022 / Published: 2 July 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medication Adherence and Beliefs About Medication: Second Edition)
Past research has demonstrated that older adults tend to use daily activities as cues to remember to take medications. However, they may still experience medication non-adherence because they did not select adequate contextual cues or face situations that interfere with their medication routines. This work addresses two research questions: (1) How does the association that older adults establish between their daily routines and their medication taking enable them to perform it consistently? (2) What problems do they face in associating daily routines with medication taking? For 30 days, using a mixed-methods approach, we collected quantitative and qualitative data from four participants aged 70–73 years old about their medication taking. We confirm that older adults who matched their medication regimens to their habitual routines obtained better results on time-based consistency measures. The main constraints for using daily routines as contextual cues were the insertion of medication taking into broad daily routines, the association of multiple daily routines with medication taking, the lack of strict daily routines, and the disruption of daily routines. We argue that the strategies proposed by the literature for forming medication-taking habits should support their formulation by measuring patients’ dosage patterns and generating logs of their daily activities. View Full-Text
Keywords: older adults; medication-taking behaviors; medication adherence; medication consistency older adults; medication-taking behaviors; medication adherence; medication consistency
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MDPI and ACS Style

Valenzuela-Beltrán, M.; Andrade, Á.G.; Stawarz, K.; Rodríguez, M.D. A Participatory Sensing Study to Understand the Problems Older Adults Faced in Developing Medication-Taking Habits. Healthcare 2022, 10, 1238. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071238

AMA Style

Valenzuela-Beltrán M, Andrade ÁG, Stawarz K, Rodríguez MD. A Participatory Sensing Study to Understand the Problems Older Adults Faced in Developing Medication-Taking Habits. Healthcare. 2022; 10(7):1238. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071238

Chicago/Turabian Style

Valenzuela-Beltrán, Maribel, Ángel G. Andrade, Katarzyna Stawarz, and Marcela D. Rodríguez. 2022. "A Participatory Sensing Study to Understand the Problems Older Adults Faced in Developing Medication-Taking Habits" Healthcare 10, no. 7: 1238. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071238

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