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An Application of Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension among Female Educational Leaders

Department of Education, University of Roehampton, London Online, London SW155PU, UK
Educ. Sci. 2018, 8(2), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8020077
Received: 20 March 2018 / Revised: 21 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 29 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Societal Culture and Educational/School Leadership)
With the exponential advancement of technology, global sharing, industrialization and economic development, national and global cultures are becoming more collective. More importantly, this fundamental paradigm shift is affecting national and global educational leadership cultures. Therefore, the power/distance index (PDI); individualism versus collectivism (IDV); uncertainty avoidance index (UAI); masculinity/femininity (MAS); and long-term orientation versus short-term orientation (LTO); are of interest when considering national and global cultures. These cultural dimensions can be exemplified in the responses of eight female educational leaders: three Canadians and one from Jamaica and Trinidad; two Grenadians and one Lebanese. This qualitative methodology in the form of a phenomenological study found that all respondents displayed varying degrees of each aspect of Hofstede’s five cultural dimensions which can be charted along a continuum from high to low index factors. Each dimension is linked to different leadership styles. PDI is linked to servant leadership, IDV is linked to shared/participatory leadership, UAI is linked to transformational leadership and emergent leadership, and MAS is linked to people versus task-oriented leadership. In each case, the slight variances in responses reflect the microcosm of the macrocosm where each country’s particular culture is mirrored. Recommendations are made for a more androgynous leadership style as well as more androgynous socialization processes if national and global educational leadership cultures are to become less gendered and more instrumental and functional based on the demands of the particular environment. It is expected that a focus could be placed on transcultural rather than intercultural studies in leadership and education. View Full-Text
Keywords: Hofstede’s cultural dimensions; transformational leadership; participatory leadership; servant leadership; emergent leadership Hofstede’s cultural dimensions; transformational leadership; participatory leadership; servant leadership; emergent leadership
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bissessar, C. An Application of Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension among Female Educational Leaders. Educ. Sci. 2018, 8, 77. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8020077

AMA Style

Bissessar C. An Application of Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension among Female Educational Leaders. Education Sciences. 2018; 8(2):77. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8020077

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bissessar, Charmaine. 2018. "An Application of Hofstede’s Cultural Dimension among Female Educational Leaders" Education Sciences 8, no. 2: 77. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci8020077

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