Next Article in Journal
Is Subjective Knowledge the Key to Fostering Sustainable Behavior? Mixed Evidence from an Education Intervention in Mexico
Next Article in Special Issue
How the Mastery Rubric for Statistical Literacy Can Generate Actionable Evidence about Statistical and Quantitative Learning Outcomes
Previous Article in Journal
Teaching Methods in Biology Education and Sustainability Education Including Outdoor Education for Promoting Sustainability—A Literature Review
Previous Article in Special Issue
Reevaluating Bloom’s Taxonomy: What Measurable Verbs Can and Cannot Say about Student Learning
Open AccessArticle

Evidence of Sustainable Learning from the Mastery Rubric for Ethical Reasoning

1
Collaborative for Research on Outcomes and Metrics; Departments of Neurology; Biostatistics, Bioinformatics & Biomathematics; Rehabilitation Medicine, Georgetown University Medical Center, Suite 207 Building D, 4000 Reservoir Road NW, Washington, DC 20057, USA
2
Catholic Health Care Ethics; Pellegrino Center for Clinical Bioethics; Department of Oncology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Suite 236, Building D, 4000 Reservoir Road NW, Washington, DC 20057, USA
3
Professor Emeritus, Georgetown University, 37th & O Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20057, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: James Albright
Educ. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci7010002
Received: 8 July 2016 / Revised: 5 December 2016 / Accepted: 8 December 2016 / Published: 23 December 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consequential Assessment of Student Learning)
Interest in sustainable learning has been growing over the past 20 years but it has never been determined whether students—whose learning we are trying to sustain—can perceive either the sustainability of their learning or any of the features of this construct. A four-item survey was developed based on a published definition of “sustainable learning”, and was sent to the 12 graduate students who have completed a new seminar in ethical reasoning. A thematic analysis of the narrative responses was submitted to a degrees-of-freedom analysis to determine the level and type of evidence for student perception of sustainability. Respondents (n = 9) endorsed each of the four dimensions of sustainable learning—and each gave examples for each dimension outside of, and after the end of, the course. One respondent endorsed all dimensions of sustainable learning, but was uncertain whether the course itself led to one particular sustainability dimension. While these results must be considered preliminary because our sample is small and the survey is the first of its kind, they suggest that graduate students can and do perceive each of the four features of sustainability. The survey needs refinement for future/wider use; but this four-dimensional definition could be useful to develop and promote (and assess) sustainable learning in higher education. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mastery Rubric; sustainable learning; ethics education; metacognition; actionable evidence of learning Mastery Rubric; sustainable learning; ethics education; metacognition; actionable evidence of learning
MDPI and ACS Style

Tractenberg, R.E.; FitzGerald, K.T.; Collmann, J. Evidence of Sustainable Learning from the Mastery Rubric for Ethical Reasoning. Educ. Sci. 2017, 7, 2.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop