Next Article in Journal
Swiss VET between National Framework and Cantonal Autonomy: A Historical Perspective
Next Article in Special Issue
The Post-Pandemic Lecture: Views from Academic Staff across the UK
Previous Article in Journal
The Pursuit of Happiness: Leadership Challenges of Recognising and Supporting Child Health and Wellbeing in the Early Years
Previous Article in Special Issue
Studying Abroad from Home: An Exploration of International Graduate Students’ Perceptions and Experiences of Emergency Remote Teaching
 
 
Article

Digital Divide Issues Affecting Undergraduates at a Hispanic-Serving Institution during the Pandemic: A Mixed-Methods Approach

1
College of Liberal Arts, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840, USA
2
University Library, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kelum A. A. Gamage
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(2), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12020115
Received: 21 December 2021 / Revised: 30 January 2022 / Accepted: 1 February 2022 / Published: 8 February 2022
Before COVID-19, digital divide research among college students was scarce, reinforcing the idea that technology access was nearly universal, with few demographic differences. Pandemic-era research found some technical challenges, but most studies were conducted nationally or at research-intensive (R1) universities, indicating a paucity in research among underrepresented populations, notably at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI). This mixed-methods study aimed to assess digital inequities and pandemic-related technological challenges at an HSI, with high percentages of low-income and first-generation students. This study also sought to determine if findings were consistent with national and R1 research. We surveyed a representative sample of 2188 undergraduates and conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 students. Results showed many students had inadequate technology. Just 79% had the optimal combination of smartphone plus laptop or desktop, with first-generation, low-income, Black, and older students significantly less likely to have this combination and often having to share devices within their households. Internet quality significantly affected all coursework-related challenges, as almost half of students with unstable internet reported trouble completing assignments compared to 20% with stable internet. Finally, results suggest the digital divide may be more prevalent at HSIs than at previously studied institutions, while also offering insight into how these challenges affect similar universities. View Full-Text
Keywords: digital divide; undergraduates; internet access; technology access; Hispanic-Serving Institution; underserved and vulnerable students digital divide; undergraduates; internet access; technology access; Hispanic-Serving Institution; underserved and vulnerable students
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bell, T.; Aubele, J.W.; Perruso, C. Digital Divide Issues Affecting Undergraduates at a Hispanic-Serving Institution during the Pandemic: A Mixed-Methods Approach. Educ. Sci. 2022, 12, 115. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12020115

AMA Style

Bell T, Aubele JW, Perruso C. Digital Divide Issues Affecting Undergraduates at a Hispanic-Serving Institution during the Pandemic: A Mixed-Methods Approach. Education Sciences. 2022; 12(2):115. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12020115

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bell, Trevor, Joseph W. Aubele, and Carol Perruso. 2022. "Digital Divide Issues Affecting Undergraduates at a Hispanic-Serving Institution during the Pandemic: A Mixed-Methods Approach" Education Sciences 12, no. 2: 115. https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12020115

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop