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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Strategic Alliances in Firm-Centric and Collective Contexts: Implications for Indigenous Entrepreneurship

1
School of Business and Governance, North West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa
2
Hill/Levene Schools of Business, University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK V4A6X3, Canada
3
School of Business and Public Administration, First Nations University of Canada, 1 First Nations Way, Regina, SK S4S7K2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Economies 2020, 8(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/economies8020031
Received: 21 October 2019 / Revised: 23 March 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 15 April 2020
How might diverse and often conflicting knowledge and belief structures and practices be mobilized into legitimate approaches for people looking to address the need for heightened responsible and sustainable entrepreneurial action by business organizations; humanizing the role of business in development? To answer this question, we explore two previously unconnected but aligned streams of literature: (i) work on strategic business alliances in general (R1); and (ii) work on corporate/Indigenous community partnerships specifically (R2). A systematic literature search identified 300 papers on the topics in total. We selected 39 general and 23 Indigenous-specific papers for review using a guiding classification matrix to determine principal themes and concepts. Both streams of literature were reviewed, and an approach was developed to identify areas where the empirical observation of Indigenous partnerships provides a contribution to the theory and practice of Indigenous entrepreneurship within the realm of strategic alliance formation, and vice versa. The paper concludes with a discussion of dissimilarities in the two streams of literature and maps out avenues for future research into strategic alliances involving corporate responsibility and sustainability (CRS), approaches based on Indigenous belief and value systems, and Indigenous entrepreneurship. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous people; entrepreneurship; sustainable development; strategic alliances; corporate responsibility and sustainability indigenous people; entrepreneurship; sustainable development; strategic alliances; corporate responsibility and sustainability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jongwe, A.I.; Moroz, P.W.; Gordon, M.; Anderson, R.B. Strategic Alliances in Firm-Centric and Collective Contexts: Implications for Indigenous Entrepreneurship. Economies 2020, 8, 31. https://doi.org/10.3390/economies8020031

AMA Style

Jongwe AI, Moroz PW, Gordon M, Anderson RB. Strategic Alliances in Firm-Centric and Collective Contexts: Implications for Indigenous Entrepreneurship. Economies. 2020; 8(2):31. https://doi.org/10.3390/economies8020031

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jongwe, Antony I.; Moroz, Peter W.; Gordon, Moses; Anderson, Robert B. 2020. "Strategic Alliances in Firm-Centric and Collective Contexts: Implications for Indigenous Entrepreneurship" Economies 8, no. 2: 31. https://doi.org/10.3390/economies8020031

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