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Article

Does One Size Fit All? A Case Study to Discuss Findings of an Augmented Hands-Free Robot Teleoperation Concept for People with and without Motor Disabilities

The Human-Computer Interaction Group, Department of Media Informatics and Communication, Westphalian University of Applied Sciences, 45897 Gelsenkirchen, Germany
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Academic Editors: Jeffrey W. Jutai and Luc de Witte
Technologies 2022, 10(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies10010004
Received: 7 December 2021 / Revised: 20 December 2021 / Accepted: 31 December 2021 / Published: 6 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Collection Selected Papers from the PETRA Conference Series)
Hands-free robot teleoperation and augmented reality have the potential to create an inclusive environment for people with motor disabilities. It may allow them to teleoperate robotic arms to manipulate objects. However, the experiences evoked by the same teleoperation concept and augmented reality can vary significantly for people with motor disabilities compared to those without disabilities. In this paper, we report the experiences of Miss L., a person with multiple sclerosis, when teleoperating a robotic arm in a hands-free multimodal manner using a virtual menu and visual hints presented through the Microsoft HoloLens 2. We discuss our findings and compare her experiences to those of people without disabilities using the same teleoperation concept. Additionally, we present three learning points from comparing these experiences: a re-evaluation of the metrics used to measure performance, being aware of the bias, and considering variability in abilities, which evokes different experiences. We consider these learning points can be extrapolated to carrying human–robot interaction evaluations with mixed groups of participants with and without disabilities. View Full-Text
Keywords: robot teleoperation; augmented reality; learning points; case study; hands-free interaction; people with motor disabilities robot teleoperation; augmented reality; learning points; case study; hands-free interaction; people with motor disabilities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Arévalo Arboleda, S.; Becker, M.; Gerken, J. Does One Size Fit All? A Case Study to Discuss Findings of an Augmented Hands-Free Robot Teleoperation Concept for People with and without Motor Disabilities. Technologies 2022, 10, 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies10010004

AMA Style

Arévalo Arboleda S, Becker M, Gerken J. Does One Size Fit All? A Case Study to Discuss Findings of an Augmented Hands-Free Robot Teleoperation Concept for People with and without Motor Disabilities. Technologies. 2022; 10(1):4. https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies10010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Arévalo Arboleda, Stephanie, Marvin Becker, and Jens Gerken. 2022. "Does One Size Fit All? A Case Study to Discuss Findings of an Augmented Hands-Free Robot Teleoperation Concept for People with and without Motor Disabilities" Technologies 10, no. 1: 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies10010004

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