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Pharmacy 2017, 5(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy5040064

Antipsychotic Polypharmacy among Children and Young Adults in Office-Based or Hospital Outpatient Department Settings

1
College of Pharmacy, Ferris State University, 220 Ferris Drive, Big Rapids, MI 49307, USA
2
College of Health Professions, Ferris State University, 200 Ferris Drive, Big Rapids, MI 49307, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 August 2017 / Revised: 6 November 2017 / Accepted: 21 November 2017 / Published: 23 November 2017
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Abstract

The purpose of the study was three-fold: (1) to estimate the national trends in antipsychotic (AP) polypharmacy among 6- to 24-year-old patients in the U.S.; (2) to identify frequently used AP agents and mental disorder diagnoses related to AP polypharmacy; and (3) to assess the strength of association between AP polypharmacy and patient/provider characteristics. We used publicly available ambulatory health care datasets to evaluate AP polypharmacy in office-based or hospital outpatient department settings to conduct a cross-sectional study. First, national visit rates between 2007 and 2011 were estimated using sampling weights. Second, common diagnoses and drugs used in AP polypharmacy were identified. Third, a multivariate logistic regression model was developed to assess the strength of association between AP polypharmacy and patient and provider characteristics. Between 2007 and 2011, approximately 2% of office-based or hospital outpatient department visits made by 6- to 24-year-old patients included one or more AP prescriptions. Of these visits, 5% were classified as AP polypharmacy. The most common combination of AP polypharmacy was to use two or more second-generation APs. Also, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia were the two most frequent primary mental disorder diagnoses among AP polypharmacy visits. The factors associated with AP polypharmacy were: older age (young adults), black, having one or more non-AP prescriptions, and having schizophrenia or ADHD. View Full-Text
Keywords: antipsychotics; polypharmacy; children; adolescents; young adults antipsychotics; polypharmacy; children; adolescents; young adults
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Sohn, M.; Burgess, M.; Bazzi, M. Antipsychotic Polypharmacy among Children and Young Adults in Office-Based or Hospital Outpatient Department Settings. Pharmacy 2017, 5, 64.

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