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Open AccessArticle

Perception of Wind in Open Spaces

1
School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia
2
Sustainable Building Innovation Lab, School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Climate 2019, 7(9), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7090106
Received: 26 July 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 2 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Climate: Strategic Planning)
Dense urbanization influences the livability of cities. Changes in local meteorological conditions can be adverse for human health and well-being. In urban open spaces, it is widely known that changes in building density and configuration in cities influence wind speed (Va). This influence modifies latent heat flux between the human body and surrounding environment and thereby affecting the thermal comfort conditions in open spaces between buildings. Several studies have demonstrated the significant effect of wind speed on outdoor thermal comfort. Melbourne’s Central Business District (CBD) has recently experienced dense urbanization and this pattern of development has instigated noticeable changes in meteorological conditions. Some evidence has suggested that the patterns of wind flow induce thermal discomfort during cool seasons. Conversely, the wind is most welcomed during warm seasons. This study was conducted to assess outdoor users’ responses to Va in three open spaces of an educational precinct in Melbourne’s CBD. The open spaces studied are different in terms of design and function. Users’ responses and meteorological conditions were examined through a series of field measurements and questionnaire surveys from November 2014 to May 2015. This study used three perceptual scales to analyze participants’ experience of Va during field surveys: “Bedford preference”, “thermal sensation” and “personal acceptability”. Analytical results yielded the wind perceptual comfort thresholds for different seasons as well as the entire study period. The results suggested that in addition to the geometry of the urban open space, the function of place could influence people’s perceptions of Va. The research findings contribute to developing thermally comfortable outdoor environments. View Full-Text
Keywords: wind speed values; urban precinct; outdoor thermal perception; wind speed threshold sensitivity wind speed values; urban precinct; outdoor thermal perception; wind speed threshold sensitivity
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Shooshtarian, S.; Rajagopalan, P. Perception of Wind in Open Spaces. Climate 2019, 7, 106.

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