Next Article in Journal
Ethnobotany, Phytochemistry and Pharmacological Activity of Kigelia africana (Lam.) Benth. (Bignoniaceae)
Previous Article in Journal
Phytochemical Profile and Pharmacological Activities of Water and Hydroethanolic Dry Extracts of Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Herb
Open AccessArticle

Comparative Plastomics of Ashwagandha (Withania, Solanaceae) and Identification of Mutational Hotspots for Barcoding Medicinal Plants

1
Department of Biochemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320, Pakistan
2
Botany Unit, Finnish Museum of Natural History, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 7, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland
3
National Genomics Data Center, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and China National Center for Bioinformation, Beijing 100101, China
4
School of Future Technology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
5
Vice Chancellor of Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000, Pakistan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Plants 2020, 9(6), 752; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9060752
Received: 9 May 2020 / Revised: 10 June 2020 / Accepted: 12 June 2020 / Published: 15 June 2020
Within the family Solanaceae, Withania is a small genus belonging to the Solanoideae subfamily. Here, we report the de novo assembled chloroplast genome sequences of W. coagulans, W. adpressa, and W. riebeckii. The length of these genomes ranged from 154,162 to 154,364 base pairs (bp). These genomes contained a pair of inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) ranging from 25,029 to 25,071 bp that were separated by a large single-copy (LSC) region of 85,635–85,765 bp and a small single-copy (SSC) region of 18,457–18,469 bp. We analyzed the structural organization, gene content and order, guanine-cytosine content, codon usage, RNA-editing sites, microsatellites, oligonucleotide and tandem repeats, and substitutions of Withania plastomes, which revealed high similarities among the species. Comparative analysis among the Withania species also highlighted 10 divergent hotspots that could potentially be used for molecular marker development, phylogenetic analysis, and species identification. Furthermore, our analyses showed that even three mutational hotspots (rps4-trnT, trnM-atpE, and rps15) were sufficient to discriminate the Withania species included in current study. View Full-Text
Keywords: ashwagandha; chloroplast genome; indels; medicinal plants; mutational hotspots; phylogenomics; Solanaceae; substitutions; Withania ashwagandha; chloroplast genome; indels; medicinal plants; mutational hotspots; phylogenomics; Solanaceae; substitutions; Withania
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Mehmood, F.; Abdullah; Ubaid, Z.; Bao, Y.; Poczai, P.; Mirza, B. Comparative Plastomics of Ashwagandha (Withania, Solanaceae) and Identification of Mutational Hotspots for Barcoding Medicinal Plants. Plants 2020, 9, 752.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop