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Article

Chilling and Freezing Temperature Stress Differently Influence Glucosinolates Content in Brassica oleracea var. acephala

1
Department of Molecular Biology, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
3
Institute of Biological Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA
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Department of Food Technology, University North, University Center Koprivnica, Trg dr. Žarka Dolinara 1, 48000 Koprivnica, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Abidur Rahman, Balakrishnan Prithiviraj, Mohammad Aslam and M. Arif Ashraf
Plants 2021, 10(7), 1305; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10071305
Received: 9 June 2021 / Revised: 23 June 2021 / Accepted: 25 June 2021 / Published: 27 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plants Response to Temperature Extremes)
Brassica oleracea var. acephala is known to have a strong tolerance to low temperatures, but the protective mechanisms enabling this tolerance are unknown. Simultaneously, this species is rich in health-promoting compounds such as polyphenols, carotenoids, and glucosinolates. We hypothesize that these metabolites play an important role in the ability to adapt to low temperature stress. To test this hypothesis, we exposed plants to chilling (8 °C) and additional freezing (−8 °C) temperatures under controlled laboratory conditions and determined the levels of proline, chlorophylls, carotenoids, polyphenols, and glucosinolates. Compared with that of the control (21 °C), the chilling and freezing temperatures increased the contents of proline, phenolic acids, and flavonoids. Detailed analysis of individual glucosinolates showed that chilling increased the total amount of aliphatic glucosinolates, while freezing increased the total amount of indolic glucosinolates, including the most abundant indolic glucosinolate glucobrassicin. Our data suggest that glucosinolates are involved in protection against low temperature stress. Individual glucosinolate species are likely to be involved in different protective mechanisms because they show different accumulation trends at chilling and freezing temperatures. View Full-Text
Keywords: Brassica oleracea var. acephala; low temperature stress; glucosinolates; polyphenols; abiotic stress Brassica oleracea var. acephala; low temperature stress; glucosinolates; polyphenols; abiotic stress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ljubej, V.; Radojčić Redovniković, I.; Salopek-Sondi, B.; Smolko, A.; Roje, S.; Šamec, D. Chilling and Freezing Temperature Stress Differently Influence Glucosinolates Content in Brassica oleracea var. acephala. Plants 2021, 10, 1305. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10071305

AMA Style

Ljubej V, Radojčić Redovniković I, Salopek-Sondi B, Smolko A, Roje S, Šamec D. Chilling and Freezing Temperature Stress Differently Influence Glucosinolates Content in Brassica oleracea var. acephala. Plants. 2021; 10(7):1305. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10071305

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ljubej, Valentina, Ivana Radojčić Redovniković, Branka Salopek-Sondi, Ana Smolko, Sanja Roje, and Dunja Šamec. 2021. "Chilling and Freezing Temperature Stress Differently Influence Glucosinolates Content in Brassica oleracea var. acephala" Plants 10, no. 7: 1305. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10071305

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