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Review

Non-Cannabinoid Metabolites of Cannabis sativa L. with Therapeutic Potential

1
Biotech R & D Institute, University of the West Indies, Mona 99999, Jamaica
2
Vilotos Pharmaceuticals Inc., Baltimore, MD 21202, USA
3
Flavocure Biotech Inc., Baltimore, MD 21202, USA
4
Institute of Human Virology (IHV), University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21202, USA
5
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Francesca Pintus
Plants 2021, 10(2), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10020400
Received: 24 November 2020 / Revised: 16 December 2020 / Accepted: 18 December 2020 / Published: 20 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research of Bioactive Substances in Plant Extracts)
The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.) produces an estimated 545 chemical compounds of different biogenetic classes. In addition to economic value, many of these phytochemicals have medicinal and physiological activity. The plant is most popularly known for its two most-prominent and most-studied secondary metabolites—Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Both Δ9-THC and CBD have a wide therapeutic window across many ailments and form part of a class of secondary metabolites called cannabinoids—of which approximately over 104 exist. This review will focus on non-cannabinoid metabolites of Cannabis sativa that also have therapeutic potential, some of which share medicinal properties similar to those of cannabinoids. The most notable of these non-cannabinoid phytochemicals are flavonoids and terpenes. We will also discuss future directions in cannabis research and development of cannabis-based pharmaceuticals. Caflanone, a flavonoid molecule with selective activity against the human viruses including the coronavirus OC43 (HCov-OC43) that is responsible for COVID-19, and certain cancers, is one of the most promising non-cannabinoid molecules that is being advanced into clinical trials. As validated by thousands of years of the use of cannabis for medicinal purposes, vast anecdotal evidence abounds on the medicinal benefits of the plant. These benefits are attributed to the many phytochemicals in this plant, including non-cannabinoids. The most promising non-cannabinoids with potential to alleviate global disease burdens are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: cannabinoids; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol; cannabidiol; non-cannabinoids; flavonoids; terpenes; secondary metabolites cannabinoids; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol; cannabidiol; non-cannabinoids; flavonoids; terpenes; secondary metabolites
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lowe, H.; Steele, B.; Bryant, J.; Toyang, N.; Ngwa, W. Non-Cannabinoid Metabolites of Cannabis sativa L. with Therapeutic Potential. Plants 2021, 10, 400. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10020400

AMA Style

Lowe H, Steele B, Bryant J, Toyang N, Ngwa W. Non-Cannabinoid Metabolites of Cannabis sativa L. with Therapeutic Potential. Plants. 2021; 10(2):400. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10020400

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lowe, Henry, Blair Steele, Joseph Bryant, Ngeh Toyang, and Wilfred Ngwa. 2021. "Non-Cannabinoid Metabolites of Cannabis sativa L. with Therapeutic Potential" Plants 10, no. 2: 400. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10020400

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