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Cutaneous Carotenoid Level Measured by Multiple Spatially Resolved Reflection Spectroscopy Sensors Correlates with Vegetable Intake and Is Increased by Continual Intake of Vegetable Juice

1
Innovation Division, KAGOME Co., Ltd., 17 Nishitomiyama, Nasushiobara 329-2762, Tochigi, Japan
2
Kurosu Hospital, 2650 Ujiie, Sakura 329-1395, Tochigi, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diseases 2021, 9(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases9010004
Received: 13 November 2020 / Revised: 25 December 2020 / Accepted: 28 December 2020 / Published: 31 December 2020
Although vegetables are beneficial for human health, in many countries, the recommended vegetable intake is not reached. To assess vegetable intake, it is important to understand vegetable consumption. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional and intervention study of 26 healthy individuals (50% women; 37.0 ± 8.9 years) and estimated vegetable intake on the basis of the cutaneous carotenoid level (CCL) with a noninvasive skin carotenoid sensor, considering that vegetable juice intake can increase CCL. Participants consumed vegetable juice containing 350 g of vegetables daily for 4 weeks. Blood carotenoid levels and CCL were measured for 12 weeks. Cross-sectional analysis showed a significant positive correlation between CCL and vegetable intake (r = 0.489). Vegetable juice consumption significantly increased CCL and the blood levels of α-carotene, β-carotene, and lycopene (p < 0.05). The correlation coefficient between the blood level and CCL for lycopene was smaller (r = 0.001) compared to that between the blood level and CCL for α-carotene (r = 0.523) and β-carotene (r = 0.460), likely because of bioavailability differences. In conclusion, noninvasive skin carotenoid measurements are effective for determining vegetable intake, and vegetable juice significantly increases CCL. View Full-Text
Keywords: carotenoid; vegetable intake; noninvasive measurement; cutaneous carotenoid; cross-sectional study; intervention study carotenoid; vegetable intake; noninvasive measurement; cutaneous carotenoid; cross-sectional study; intervention study
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hayashi, H.; Sato, I.; Suganuma, H. Cutaneous Carotenoid Level Measured by Multiple Spatially Resolved Reflection Spectroscopy Sensors Correlates with Vegetable Intake and Is Increased by Continual Intake of Vegetable Juice. Diseases 2021, 9, 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases9010004

AMA Style

Hayashi H, Sato I, Suganuma H. Cutaneous Carotenoid Level Measured by Multiple Spatially Resolved Reflection Spectroscopy Sensors Correlates with Vegetable Intake and Is Increased by Continual Intake of Vegetable Juice. Diseases. 2021; 9(1):4. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases9010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hayashi, Hiroki, Ikuo Sato, and Hiroyuki Suganuma. 2021. "Cutaneous Carotenoid Level Measured by Multiple Spatially Resolved Reflection Spectroscopy Sensors Correlates with Vegetable Intake and Is Increased by Continual Intake of Vegetable Juice" Diseases 9, no. 1: 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases9010004

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