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Antibiotics 2018, 7(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics7010016

Protective Effects of Bacteriophages against Aeromonas hydrophila Causing Motile Aeromonas Septicemia (MAS) in Striped Catfish

1
GeneCology Research Centre, Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, 90 Sippy Downs Drive, Sippy Downs, Queensland 4556, Australia
2
Research Institute for Marine Fisheries, 224 Le Lai, Ngo Quyen, Hai Phong 180000, Vietnam
3
Research Institute for Aquaculture No. 2, 116 Nguyen Dinh Chieu, District 1, Ho Chi Minh 700000, Vietnam
4
Australian Centre for Pacific Islands Research and Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, QLD 4556, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 December 2017 / Revised: 30 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 February 2018 / Published: 25 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacteriophages: Alternatives to Antibiotics and Beyond)
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Abstract

To determine the effectivity of bacteriophages in controlling the mass mortality of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) due to infections caused by Aeromonas spp. in Vietnamese fish farms, bacteriophages against pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila were isolated. A. hydrophila-phage 2 and A. hydrophila-phage 5 were successfully isolated from water samples from the Saigon River of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. These phages, belonging to the Myoviridae family, were found to have broad activity spectra, even against the tested multiple-antibiotic-resistant Aeromonas isolates. The latent periods and burst size of phage 2 were 10 min and 213 PFU per infected host cell, respectively. The bacteriophages proved to be effective in inhibiting the growth of the Aeromonas spp. under laboratory conditions. Phage treatments applied to the pathogenic strains during infestation of catfish resulted in a significant improvement in the survival rates of the tested fishes, with up to 100% survival with MOI 100, compared to 18.3% survival observed in control experiments. These findings illustrate the potential for using phages as an effective bio-treatment method to control Motile Aeromonas Septicemia (MAS) in fish farms. This study provides further evidence towards the use of bacteriophages to effectively control disease in aquaculture operations. View Full-Text
Keywords: Aeromonas hydrophila; Motile Aeromonas Septicemia; MAS; multiple-antibiotic-resistance; bacteriophage; biological control; striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) Aeromonas hydrophila; Motile Aeromonas Septicemia; MAS; multiple-antibiotic-resistance; bacteriophage; biological control; striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus)
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Le, T.S.; Nguyen, T.H.; Vo, H.P.; Doan, V.C.; Nguyen, H.L.; Tran, M.T.; Tran, T.T.; Southgate, P.C.; Kurtböke, D.İ. Protective Effects of Bacteriophages against Aeromonas hydrophila Causing Motile Aeromonas Septicemia (MAS) in Striped Catfish. Antibiotics 2018, 7, 16.

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