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Article

How Accurate Are Veterinary Clinicians Employing Flexicult Vet for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Urinary Bacteria?

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Veterinary Clinic Zamba, Vets4science d.o.o., 3000 Celje, Slovenia
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Biophotonics Laboratory, Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia, 1586 Riga, Latvia
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Vetamplify SIA, Veterinary Services, 1009 Riga, Latvia
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Institute of Microbiology and Parasitology, Veterinary Faculty, University of Ljubljana, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Albert Figueras
Antibiotics 2021, 10(10), 1160; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10101160
Received: 27 August 2021 / Revised: 16 September 2021 / Accepted: 22 September 2021 / Published: 24 September 2021
Antibiotics are frequently used for treating urinary tract infections (UTI) in dogs and cats. UTI often requires time-consuming and expensive antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST). Alternatively, clinicians can employ Flexicult Vet, an affordable chromogenic agar with added antibiotics for in-clinic AST. We investigated how well veterinary microbiologists and clinicians, without any prior experience, employ Flexicult Vet for the identification and AST of the most common canine and feline urinary pathogenic bacteria. We prepared 47 monoculture plates containing 10 bacterial species. The test’s mean accuracy was 75.1% for bacteria identification (84.6% and 68.7% for microbiologists and clinicians, respectively) and 79.2% for AST (80.7% and 78.2%). All evaluators employed Flexicult Vet with the accuracies over 90% for the distinctively colored bacteria like Escherichia coli (red), Enterococcus faecalis (turquoise), and Proteus spp. (pale brown). However, the evaluators’ experience proved important in recognizing lightly colored bacteria like Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (accuracies of 82.6% and 40.3%). Misidentifications of E. faecium additionally worsened AST performance since bacterial intrinsic resistance could not be considered. Finally, only 33.3% (3/9) of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) were correctly detected. To conclude, Flexicult Vet proved reliable for certain urinary pathogens. In contrast, light-colored bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus), often misidentified, require a standard AST. View Full-Text
Keywords: urinary tract infection; Flexicult Vet; antimicrobial susceptibility testing; pathogen identification; dogs; cats; veterinary microbiology urinary tract infection; Flexicult Vet; antimicrobial susceptibility testing; pathogen identification; dogs; cats; veterinary microbiology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cugmas, B.; Avberšek, M.; Rosa, T.; Godec, L.; Štruc, E.; Golob, M.; Zdovc, I. How Accurate Are Veterinary Clinicians Employing Flexicult Vet for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Urinary Bacteria? Antibiotics 2021, 10, 1160. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10101160

AMA Style

Cugmas B, Avberšek M, Rosa T, Godec L, Štruc E, Golob M, Zdovc I. How Accurate Are Veterinary Clinicians Employing Flexicult Vet for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Urinary Bacteria? Antibiotics. 2021; 10(10):1160. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10101160

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cugmas, Blaž, Miha Avberšek, Teja Rosa, Leonida Godec, Eva Štruc, Majda Golob, and Irena Zdovc. 2021. "How Accurate Are Veterinary Clinicians Employing Flexicult Vet for Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Urinary Bacteria?" Antibiotics 10, no. 10: 1160. https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10101160

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