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Open AccessArticle

Gender, Age and Subjective Well-Being: Towards Personalized Persuasive Health Interventions

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Faculty of Computing, Federal University Dutse, Dutse P.M.B. 7156, Jigawa State, Nigeria
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Faculty of Computer Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
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Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida University, Lapai 740005, Nigeria
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Information 2019, 10(10), 301; https://doi.org/10.3390/info10100301
Received: 16 August 2019 / Revised: 20 September 2019 / Accepted: 23 September 2019 / Published: 27 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalizing Persuasive Technologies)
(1) Background: Subjective well-being (SWB) is an individual’s judgment about their overall well-being. Research has shown that high subjective well-being contributes to overall health. SWB consists of both Affective and Cognitive dimensions. Existing studies on SWB are limited in two major ways: first, they focused mainly on the Affective dimension. Second, most existing studies are focused on individuals from the Western and Asian nations; (2) Methods: To resolve these weaknesses and contribute to research on personalizing persuasive health interventions to promote SWB, we conducted a large-scale study of 732 participants from Nigeria to investigate what factors affect their SWB using both the Affective and Cognitive dimensions and how distinct SWB components relates to different gender and age group. We employed the Structural Equation Model (SEM) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to develop models showing how gender and age relate to the distinct components of SWB; (3) Results: Our study reveals significant differences between gender and age groups. Males are more associated with social well-being and satisfaction with life components while females are more associated with emotional well-being. As regards age, younger adults (under 24) are more associated with social well-being and happiness while older adults (over 65) are more associated with psychological well-being, emotional well-being, and satisfaction with life. (4) Conclusions: The results could inform designers of the appropriate SWB components to target when personalizing persuasive health interventions to promote overall well-being for people belonging to various gender and age groups. We offer design guidelines for tailoring persuasive intervention to increase SWB based on an individual’s age and gender group. Finally, we map SWB components to possible persuasive technology design strategies that can be employed to implement them in persuasive interventions design. View Full-Text
Keywords: subjective well-being; gender; age; persuasive health interventions; personalization subjective well-being; gender; age; persuasive health interventions; personalization
MDPI and ACS Style

Abdullahi, A.M.; Orji, R.; Kawu, A.A. Gender, Age and Subjective Well-Being: Towards Personalized Persuasive Health Interventions. Information 2019, 10, 301.

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