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High-Rise Apartments and Urban Mental Health—Historical and Contemporary Views

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Centre for Ecosystem Management, School of Science, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia
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inVIVO Planetary Health, Research Group of the Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), 6010 Park Ave, Suite #4081, West New York, NJ 07093, USA
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School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
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The ORIGINS Project, Telethon Kids Institute, Perth Children’s Hospital, 15 Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Challenges 2019, 10(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/challe10020034
Received: 20 June 2019 / Revised: 12 July 2019 / Accepted: 16 July 2019 / Published: 31 July 2019
High-rise apartment buildings have long been associated with the poor mental health of their residents. The aims of this paper are to examine whether this connection is necessarily so, by reviewing the evidence relating to the relationships between high-rise living and social wellbeing, occupant’s stress levels, and the influence they have on mental health. From selected literature, psychological stress and poor mental health outcomes of the populations that live in high-rise apartments are indeed apparent, and this is particularly so for apartments in poor neighbourhoods. Yet many apartments in developed cities are in affluent areas (particularly those with views of green/blue space), where residences on higher floors are more expensive. Either way, high-rise living and mental health outcomes are a social justice issue. Our review allows us to propose two models relating to high-rise living relevant today, based on these differences. View Full-Text
Keywords: high-rise apartments; social justice; mental health; stress; wellbeing; socioeconomic status high-rise apartments; social justice; mental health; stress; wellbeing; socioeconomic status
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Larcombe, D.-L.; van Etten, E.; Logan, A.; Prescott, S.L.; Horwitz, P. High-Rise Apartments and Urban Mental Health—Historical and Contemporary Views. Challenges 2019, 10, 34.

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