Next Article in Journal
Transcendental Trinitarian: James Marsh, the Free Will Problem, and the American Intellectual Context of Coleridge’s Aids to Reflection
Previous Article in Journal
Pietas Austriaca? The Imperial Legacy in Interwar and Postwar Austria
Open AccessArticle

Namaste Theory: A Quantitative Grounded Theory on Religion and Spirituality in Mental Health Treatment

Diana R. Garland School of Social Work, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97320, Waco, TX 76798, USA
Religions 2017, 8(9), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel8090168
Received: 10 August 2017 / Revised: 11 August 2017 / Accepted: 25 August 2017 / Published: 30 August 2017
A growing body of research is beginning to identify characteristics that influence or are related to helping professionals’ integration of clients’ religion and spirituality (RS) in mental health treatment. This article presents Namaste Theory, a new theory for understanding the role of mental health practitioners’ RS in clinical practice. Using Glaser’s (2008) formal quantitative grounded theory approach, this article describes an emerging theme in the author’s line of work—particularly that practitioners’ intrinsic religiosity is significantly related to their consideration of clients’ RS—and explores the findings of related, interdisciplinary studies. The Hindu term, Namaste, meaning, “the sacred in me recognizes the sacred in you”, provided a framework to explain the emerging theme. Specifically, Namaste Theory introduces the concept that as helping professionals infuse their own RS beliefs/practices into their daily lives, deepening their intrinsic religiosity and awareness of what they deem sacred, they tend to consider and integrate clients’ RS beliefs/practices, and what clients consider sacred as well. In order words, as the helping professional recognizes the sacred within him or herself, s/he appears to be more open to recognizing the sacred within his/her client. Future directions for research, as well as practice and education implications, are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: mental health; religion; spirituality; Namaste; grounded theory; therapy; counseling; clinical social work mental health; religion; spirituality; Namaste; grounded theory; therapy; counseling; clinical social work
MDPI and ACS Style

Oxhandler, H.K. Namaste Theory: A Quantitative Grounded Theory on Religion and Spirituality in Mental Health Treatment. Religions 2017, 8, 168.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop