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Globalization, Inequality & International Economic Law

Boston College Law school, Boston College, 885 Centre Street, Newton Centre, MA 02459, USA
Academic Editors: Kate Ward and Kenneth Himes
Religions 2017, 8(5), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel8050078
Received: 7 February 2017 / Revised: 4 April 2017 / Accepted: 4 April 2017 / Published: 26 April 2017
International law in general, and international economic law in particular, to the extent that either has focused on the issue of inequality, has done so in terms of inequality between states. Largely overlooked has been the topic of inequality within states and how international law has influenced that reality. From the perspective of international economic law, the inequality issue is closely entwined with the topics of colonialism and post-colonialism, the proper meaning of development, and globalization. While international economic law has undoubtedly contributed to the rise of inequality, it is now vital that the subject of international economic law be examined for how it may contribute to the lessening of inequality. To do so will require a shift in the way that we think, in order to address inequality as a problem of an emerging global market society, and how best to regulate that society and its institutions. View Full-Text
Keywords: international economic law; globalization; international trade; global market society; John Rawls; global inequality international economic law; globalization; international trade; global market society; John Rawls; global inequality
MDPI and ACS Style

Garcia, F.J. Globalization, Inequality & International Economic Law. Religions 2017, 8, 78.

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