Next Article in Journal
Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Mental Health Care, Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
Next Article in Special Issue
Hinduism in India and Congregational Forms: Influences of Modernization and Social Networks
Previous Article in Journal
Sacred Psychotherapy in the “Age of Authenticity”: Healing and Cultural Revivalism in Contemporary Finland
Previous Article in Special Issue
Does Religious Involvement Generate or Inhibit Fear of Crime?
Open AccessArticle

The Sociology of Humanist, Spiritual, and Religious Practice in Prison: Supporting Responsivity and Desistance from Crime

1
Transforming Corrections, 1420 Court St. NE. Salem, Oregon 97301, USA
2
Oregon Department of Corrections, 2575 Center St. NE., Salem, OR 97301, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2011, 2(4), 590-610; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel2040590
Received: 20 September 2011 / Accepted: 24 October 2011 / Published: 2 November 2011
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Studies in the Sociology of Religion)
This paper presents evidence for why Corrections should take the humanist, spiritual, and religious self-identities of people in prison seriously, and do all it can to foster and support those self-identities, or ways of establishing meaning in life. Humanist, spiritual, and religious (H/S/R) pathways to meaning can be an essential part of the evidence-based responsivity principle of effective correctional programming, and the desistance process for men and women involved in crime. This paper describes the sociology of the H/S/R involvement of 349 women and 3,009 men during the first year of their incarceration in the Oregon prison system. Ninety-five percent of the women and 71% of the men voluntarily attended at least one H/S/R event during their first year of prison. H/S/R events were mostly led by diverse religious and spiritual traditions, such as Native American, Protestant, Islamic, Wiccan, Jewish, Jehovah Witness, Latter-day Saints/Mormon, Seventh Day Adventist, Buddhist, and Catholic, but, increasingly, events are secular or humanist in context, such as education, yoga, life-skills development, non-violent communication, and transcendental meditation groups. The men and women in prison had much higher rates of H/S/R involvement than the general population in Oregon. Mirroring gender-specific patterns of H/S/R involvement found in the community, women in prison were much more likely to attend H/S/R events than men. View Full-Text
Keywords: prison; humanist; spiritual; religious; responsivity; desistance; gender; religion; corrections; treatment prison; humanist; spiritual; religious; responsivity; desistance; gender; religion; corrections; treatment
MDPI and ACS Style

O’Connor, T.P.; Duncan, J.B. The Sociology of Humanist, Spiritual, and Religious Practice in Prison: Supporting Responsivity and Desistance from Crime. Religions 2011, 2, 590-610.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Only visits after 24 November 2015 are recorded.
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop