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Article

Withered Wood and Dead Ashes—Making Sense of the Sacred Bodies of Kamatari at Tōnomine

Department of Religion and Theology, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TB, UK
Academic Editors: Andrea Castiglioni and Bernard Faure
Religions 2022, 13(5), 439; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13050439
Received: 14 April 2022 / Accepted: 5 May 2022 / Published: 13 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aspects of Medieval Japanese Religion)
The portrait statue of Fujiwara Kamatari (614–669) enshrined at Tōnomine is well known for its agency and mantic powers. Known to crack whenever the stability of the clan was under threat, the icon was carefully observed and cared for. However, not one but two portrait statues of the Fujiwara ancestor existed at Tōnomine in the Heian period, until one was destroyed in the infamous 1208 attack by armed supporters of Kinpusen. This article proposes first to investigate the relationship between these two icons, to show how their dynamic interaction is at the source of the cracking episodes that came to define Kamatari’s cult in later centuries. Then, by looking at the ways in which members of the Fujiwara clan reflected on the nature of the remains of the statue lost in 1208 and on the role of the extant one, it draws attention to how the ritualization of Kamatari’s statue was also couched in Confucian ideas and practices. View Full-Text
Keywords: Kamatari; ancestor worship; sacred material culture; sacred waste; divination Kamatari; ancestor worship; sacred material culture; sacred waste; divination
MDPI and ACS Style

Lomi, B. Withered Wood and Dead Ashes—Making Sense of the Sacred Bodies of Kamatari at Tōnomine. Religions 2022, 13, 439. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13050439

AMA Style

Lomi B. Withered Wood and Dead Ashes—Making Sense of the Sacred Bodies of Kamatari at Tōnomine. Religions. 2022; 13(5):439. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13050439

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lomi, Benedetta. 2022. "Withered Wood and Dead Ashes—Making Sense of the Sacred Bodies of Kamatari at Tōnomine" Religions 13, no. 5: 439. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel13050439

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