Next Article in Journal
Abandoning Penal Substitution: A Patristic Inspiration for Contemporary Protestant Understanding of the Atonement
Next Article in Special Issue
Global Contexts: How Countries Shape the COVID-19 Experience of Amish and Mennonite Missionaries Abroad
Previous Article in Journal
“All of Us” before God: Phenomenological Contours of the Liturgical Assembly according to Franz Rosenzweig and Jean-Yves Lacoste
Article

“I Discovered I Love to Pray Alone Too”: Pluralist Muslim Women’s Approaches to Practicing Islam during and after Ramadan 2020

1
Department of Religious Studies, Northwestern University, Crowe Hall 4-134, 1860 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
2
Institute of Religious Studies, Jagiellonian University, ul. Grodzka 52, 31-044 Kraków, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Magdalena Szaflarski
Religions 2021, 12(9), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12090784
Received: 28 July 2021 / Revised: 9 September 2021 / Accepted: 12 September 2021 / Published: 17 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religion and Public Health Threats in the 21st Century)
Public health guidelines implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic have changed the way many people practice religion. In the realm of Islam, practices from the margins—attending online mosques and prayer groups, or praying alone—suddenly became commonplace. This paper addresses the question: What religious processes have become more evident among pluralist Muslim women during the pandemic? Based on 34 open-ended online surveys completed by pluralist Muslim women living chiefly in the USA and the UK, our analysis evidences the existence of four narratives that reflect fluctuations in the intensity and type of religious practice. The first and most prominent narrative in our dataset conveys enthusiastic embrace of social-distanced practices; the second describes a profound sense of aberration impossible to overcome in spiritual ways. The third highlights that for some Muslims, the pandemic brought no changes, as they continued to be isolated from their communities. The fourth is focused on an affirmation of a “remote” sociality experienced online. While some respondents acknowledge the increased individuation in their religious practice, they also find fulfilment in collective, if transformed, sociality. The changes in social interaction have led to a re-evaluation of salient aspects of their religious identity or, alternatively, highlighted longstanding modalities of exclusion. View Full-Text
Keywords: Islam; Muslim; women; pluralist lived religion; COVID-19; social distancing; isolation; online mosques Islam; Muslim; women; pluralist lived religion; COVID-19; social distancing; isolation; online mosques
MDPI and ACS Style

Piela, A.; Krotofil, J. “I Discovered I Love to Pray Alone Too”: Pluralist Muslim Women’s Approaches to Practicing Islam during and after Ramadan 2020. Religions 2021, 12, 784. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12090784

AMA Style

Piela A, Krotofil J. “I Discovered I Love to Pray Alone Too”: Pluralist Muslim Women’s Approaches to Practicing Islam during and after Ramadan 2020. Religions. 2021; 12(9):784. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12090784

Chicago/Turabian Style

Piela, Anna, and Joanna Krotofil. 2021. "“I Discovered I Love to Pray Alone Too”: Pluralist Muslim Women’s Approaches to Practicing Islam during and after Ramadan 2020" Religions 12, no. 9: 784. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12090784

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop