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Post-Islamism in Tunisia and Egypt: Contradictory Trajectories

Department of Modern Languages & Cultural Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada
Academic Editors: Mojtaba Mahdavi and Enzo Pace
Religions 2021, 12(6), 408; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060408
Received: 22 February 2021 / Revised: 27 April 2021 / Accepted: 21 May 2021 / Published: 3 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Many Faces of Contemporary Post-Islamism)
In the wake of the Tunisian Revolution of 2011, Ennahda leader Rached Ghannouchi distanced his party from the main Islamist paradigm, which is spearheaded primarily by the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, and announced the separation of the religious movement entirely from its political wing (al-Siyasi and al-da’awi). In addition to reassuring Tunisians that Ennahda’s socio-political project is rooted in its “Tunisianity,” these measures aimed at signaling Ennahda’s joining the camp of post-Islamist parties and Muslim democrats such as the AKP in Turkey and the JDP in Morocco. In this article, using the comparative case studies, I examine the patterns, similarities, and differences between the Tunisian Ennahda party and the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood in terms of their evolutions from an Islamist to a post-Islamist discourse and identity. I argue that the Ennahda party outpaced the Muslim Brotherhood in that shift considering the local/regional realities and the new compromises dictated by the post-revolutionary political processes in both countries. Although the Muslim Brotherhood managed to come to power and govern for only one year before being deposed by the army, Ennahda’s political pragmatism (consensus, compromise, and coalition) enabled it to fare well, ultimately prodding the party to adapt and reposition itself intellectually and politically. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ennahda party; Islamism; Muslim brotherhood; post-Islamism; political Islam; Rached Ghannouchi Ennahda party; Islamism; Muslim brotherhood; post-Islamism; political Islam; Rached Ghannouchi
MDPI and ACS Style

Ben Lazreg, H. Post-Islamism in Tunisia and Egypt: Contradictory Trajectories. Religions 2021, 12, 408. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060408

AMA Style

Ben Lazreg H. Post-Islamism in Tunisia and Egypt: Contradictory Trajectories. Religions. 2021; 12(6):408. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060408

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ben Lazreg, Houssem. 2021. "Post-Islamism in Tunisia and Egypt: Contradictory Trajectories" Religions 12, no. 6: 408. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060408

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