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Article

Current Mental Health Clients’ Attitudes Regarding Religion and Spirituality in Treatment: A National Survey

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Diana R. Garland School of Social Work, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798, USA
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Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA
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Graduate School, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA
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Clarke Center for Human Imagination, Department of Physical Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0021, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Hans Zollner, Jesse Fox and Evan Copello
Religions 2021, 12(6), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060371
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 29 April 2021 / Accepted: 13 May 2021 / Published: 21 May 2021
Over the last several years, there has been a growing interest in clients’ views toward integrating their religion and spirituality (RS) into mental health treatment. However, most of these studies have been limited to small samples and specific populations, regions, and/or clinical issues. This article describes the first national survey of current mental health clients across the US regarding their attitudes towards integrating their RS in treatment using a revised version of the Religious/Spiritually Integrated Practice Assessment Scale-Client Attitudes, version 2 (RSIPAS-CAv2) with a sample of 989 clients. Our findings indicate mental health clients have overwhelmingly positive attitudes regarding integrating their RS into mental health treatment. Additionally, we explored what background characteristics predict clients’ attitudes toward this area of practice and found the top predictor was their intrinsic religiosity, followed by whether they had previously discussed RS with their current provider, age, gender, organized and non-organized religious activities, belief in God/Higher Power, and frequency of seeing their mental health provider. The reliability and validity of the RSIPAS-CAv2 was also explored and this scale is recommended for future use. Implications and recommendations for practice, research, and future training efforts are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: religion; spirituality; mental health; client preferences; therapy; counseling; social work; psychology; psychiatry; attitudes; depression; anxiety religion; spirituality; mental health; client preferences; therapy; counseling; social work; psychology; psychiatry; attitudes; depression; anxiety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oxhandler, H.K.; Pargament, K.I.; Pearce, M.J.; Vieten, C.; Moffatt, K.M. Current Mental Health Clients’ Attitudes Regarding Religion and Spirituality in Treatment: A National Survey. Religions 2021, 12, 371. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060371

AMA Style

Oxhandler HK, Pargament KI, Pearce MJ, Vieten C, Moffatt KM. Current Mental Health Clients’ Attitudes Regarding Religion and Spirituality in Treatment: A National Survey. Religions. 2021; 12(6):371. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060371

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oxhandler, Holly K., Kenneth I. Pargament, Michelle J. Pearce, Cassandra Vieten, and Kelsey M. Moffatt. 2021. "Current Mental Health Clients’ Attitudes Regarding Religion and Spirituality in Treatment: A National Survey" Religions 12, no. 6: 371. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel12060371

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