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Open AccessArticle

Islam in Australia: A National Survey of Muslim Australian Citizens and Permanent Residents

1
Centre for Social and Cultural Research, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia
2
School of Humanities, Languages and Social Science, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia
3
School of Human Services and Social Work, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Religions 2020, 11(8), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080419
Received: 27 July 2020 / Revised: 11 August 2020 / Accepted: 11 August 2020 / Published: 14 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Islamic and Muslim Studies in Australia)
This article presents the findings of a national survey on Islam in Australia based on responses of 1034 Muslim Australian citizens and permanent residents. Knowing what Muslim Australians think about Islam in relation to Australian society is essential for a more informed understanding about Islam and Muslims needed to address misinformation, Islamophobia, and extremism. The findings presented in this article include typologies of Muslims; sources of influence concerning Islam; interpretations of the Qur’an; perspectives on ethical, social, and theological issues; issues of concern; social connections and sense of belonging; views on various Muslim-majority countries; and perspectives concerning political Islam, including jihad, caliphate, and shariah. While respondents’ understandings, interpretations, and expressions of Islam overall align with values and principles of equality, human rights, social cohesion, and social justice, a minority were found to understand and interpret Islam in ways that reflect the influence of late 20th and early 21st century ideas associated with Islamist political ideology, and a smaller sub-group were found to have views that could be considered extreme. This article discusses these findings in relation to the early 21st century time-period factors and the Australian social context. View Full-Text
Keywords: Islam; Muslims; Australia; online survey; national security; social cohesion Islam; Muslims; Australia; online survey; national security; social cohesion
MDPI and ACS Style

Rane, H.; Duderija, A.; Rahimullah, R.H.; Mitchell, P.; Mamone, J.; Satterley, S. Islam in Australia: A National Survey of Muslim Australian Citizens and Permanent Residents. Religions 2020, 11, 419.

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