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Towards East Asian Ecotheologies of Climate Crisis
Article

The World on Fire: A Buddhist Response to the Environmental Crisis

Department of Religion, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
Religions 2020, 11(8), 381; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080381
Received: 29 May 2020 / Revised: 6 July 2020 / Accepted: 17 July 2020 / Published: 23 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Religious Engagement with Climate Change)
This paper identifies and responds to the four main objections raised against Buddhist environmentalism. It argues that none of these objections is insurmountable and that, in fact, Buddhists have developed numerous concepts, arguments, and practices which could prove useful for dealing with the most pressing environmental problems we have created. Buddhism is sometimes described by its critics as too detached from worldly concerns to respond to the environmental crisis but the successes of Engaged Buddhism demonstrate otherwise. Although halting climate change will require inter-governmental co-operation and immediate action, we should not underestimate the necessity of grassroots movements for achieving lasting change in our attitudes and behaviours. If meditation can awaken us to the fact of ecological inter-connectedness and to the ultimate drivers of climate change (e.g., greediness and a misplaced sense of entitlement) it can also help us reconnect with nature and expand our circle of moral concern to include plants, animals, and the wider environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: Engaged Buddhism; inter-dependency; contentment; climate change; environmental ethics Engaged Buddhism; inter-dependency; contentment; climate change; environmental ethics
MDPI and ACS Style

Javanaud, K. The World on Fire: A Buddhist Response to the Environmental Crisis. Religions 2020, 11, 381. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080381

AMA Style

Javanaud K. The World on Fire: A Buddhist Response to the Environmental Crisis. Religions. 2020; 11(8):381. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080381

Chicago/Turabian Style

Javanaud, Katie. 2020. "The World on Fire: A Buddhist Response to the Environmental Crisis" Religions 11, no. 8: 381. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11080381

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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