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A Samaritan Synagogue of the Byzantine Period at Apollonia-Arsuf/Sozousa?
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Samaritans in the New Testament

Fachbereich Evangelische Theologie, Fakultät für Geisteswissenschaften, Universität Hamburg, 20354 Hamburg, Germany
This article is a summary of initial, previously unpublished considerations from a larger study in German that has been in progress since 2018. I would like to thank Kaja Wieczorek and Jocasta Godlieb for the translation.
Religions 2020, 11(3), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11030147
Received: 13 February 2020 / Revised: 18 March 2020 / Accepted: 18 March 2020 / Published: 23 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring Samaritanism)
Four New Testament writings mention Samaritans and Samaria—Luke–Acts, John, and Matthew. We must consider that all Samaritan texts in the New Testament are based on a historically correct knowledge of the cult of YHWH worshippers in Samaria oriented towards the Gerizim. If the YHWH admirers in Samaria are to be understood as one of the two independent “Israel” denominations that existed in the Palestinian heartland during the post-exilic period, consequently, in John, Matthew, and Luke–Acts, attention is paid to their understanding of the ecclesiological significance of “Israel” and to Christological aspects. Moreover, the authors of the Gospels reflect a semantically young phenomenon, when Σαμαρῖται is understood beyond the ethnicon as a term for a group religiously distinct from Judaism. At the time of Paul, the term “Samaritan” had not yet been established to refer to the religiously defined group. This means that care must be taken when interpreting the term “Israel” and “Israelites” in all Jewish or Jewish-Christian texts written before 70 A.D. This also applies to Paul: when Paul speaks of “Israel”, “Israelites”, and “circumcision”, he could have consciously used inclusive terminology that, in principle, included the (later named) “Samaritans” in the diaspora. View Full-Text
Keywords: Luke–Acts; Gospel of Matthew; Gospel of John; Pauline letters; 2Kings; Septuagint; inscriptions (Greek); Josephus; Israel/Israelites; historical Jesus; Mount Gerizim; post-exilic period; Pentateuch; Moses; Jerusalem; diaspora; Delos; Ben Sira Luke–Acts; Gospel of Matthew; Gospel of John; Pauline letters; 2Kings; Septuagint; inscriptions (Greek); Josephus; Israel/Israelites; historical Jesus; Mount Gerizim; post-exilic period; Pentateuch; Moses; Jerusalem; diaspora; Delos; Ben Sira
MDPI and ACS Style

Böhm, M. Samaritans in the New Testament. Religions 2020, 11, 147.

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