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Article

On the Discursive and Methodological Categorisation of Islam and Muslims in the West: Ontological and Epistemological Considerations

Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University, Melbourne 3217, Australia
Religions 2020, 11(10), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100501
Received: 25 August 2020 / Revised: 21 September 2020 / Accepted: 28 September 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Islamic and Muslim Studies in Australia)
This article reflects on the ethical and epistemological challenges facing researchers engaged in contemporary studies of Islam and Muslims in the West. Particularly, it focuses on the impact of the constructions and categorisations of Muslims and Islam in research. To do this, it considers the entwinement of public discourses and the development of research agendas and projects. To examine this complex and enmeshed process, this article explores ideological, discursive and epistemological approaches that it argues researchers need to consider. In invoking these three approaches alongside an analysis of a collection of recent research, this article contends that questions of race, religion and politics have been deployed to reinforce, rather than challenge, certain essentialist/orientalist representations of Islam and Muslims in the West in research. As this article shows, this practice is increasingly threatening to compromise, in a Habermasian communicative sense (i.e., the opportunity to speak and be heard for all concerned), the ethical and epistemological underpinnings of social science research with its emphasis on inclusion and respect. View Full-Text
Keywords: Muslim migrants; reporting/representing Islam; epistemological bias; social categorisation; methodological reductionism Muslim migrants; reporting/representing Islam; epistemological bias; social categorisation; methodological reductionism
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mansouri, F. On the Discursive and Methodological Categorisation of Islam and Muslims in the West: Ontological and Epistemological Considerations. Religions 2020, 11, 501. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100501

AMA Style

Mansouri F. On the Discursive and Methodological Categorisation of Islam and Muslims in the West: Ontological and Epistemological Considerations. Religions. 2020; 11(10):501. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100501

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mansouri, Fethi. 2020. "On the Discursive and Methodological Categorisation of Islam and Muslims in the West: Ontological and Epistemological Considerations" Religions 11, no. 10: 501. https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11100501

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