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‘Go and Prophesy in Your Own Land’: Foreign Prophets and Popularism in South Africa. Evoking the Need of Jonathanic Theology for Peaceful Resolution of Difference

Education, University of the Free State, QwaQwa 9866, South Africa
Religions 2020, 11(1), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11010042
Received: 14 November 2019 / Revised: 29 November 2019 / Accepted: 13 December 2019 / Published: 13 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Peace, Politics, and Religion)
Informed by a decoloniality lens and referencing motifs such as coloniality of power, knowledge, and being, this theoretical article analyses and problematises conflict, and reconstructs the experience of foreign and local prophets in South Africa. There is growing tension between foreign pastors and local pastors, with the former seemingly being popular because of performing ‘miracles,’ huge followings, and, in some cases, through mafia tendencies, which ignite the notion that expelling them from South Africa can be a counter-hegemony strategy to deal with popularism and criminality. The articles respond to two questions in this article: What factors influence conflict between migrant and local prophets? and, how can the story of David and Jonathan be used as a starting point for collective engagement in a process to achieve peace and healing? The article ends with arguing that the Jonathanic theology of peace, if pursued by migrant and local prophetic movements in South Africa, can reconstruct the prophetic terrain and assist in facilitating a rehumanising process, in addition to enacting the ontological density that has been lost. The article ends by arguing that Jonathanic theology is doable and desirable as a sustainable solution for religious conflict in South Africa. View Full-Text
Keywords: Jonathanic theology; migrant prophets; legislation; peace and decoloniality Jonathanic theology; migrant prophets; legislation; peace and decoloniality
MDPI and ACS Style

Dube, B. ‘Go and Prophesy in Your Own Land’: Foreign Prophets and Popularism in South Africa. Evoking the Need of Jonathanic Theology for Peaceful Resolution of Difference. Religions 2020, 11, 42.

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