Next Article in Journal
Internet and Islamic Learning Practices in Indonesia: Social Media, Religious Populism, and Religious Authority
Next Article in Special Issue
Facing the Monsters: Otherness in H. P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos and Guillermo del Toro’s Pacific Rim and Hellboy
Previous Article in Journal
Challenge of Doing Catholic Ethics in a Pluralistic Context
Previous Article in Special Issue
“What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes”: Relational Theology and Ways of Seeing in Blade Runner
Open AccessArticle

Altar Call of Cthulhu: Religion and Millennialism in H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos

Department of Religion, Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, IL 60045, USA
Religions 2020, 11(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel11010018
Received: 11 October 2019 / Revised: 11 December 2019 / Accepted: 23 December 2019 / Published: 30 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue This and Other Worlds: Religion and Science Fiction)
Religion suffuses H.P. Lovecraft’s (1890–1937) short stories—the most famous of which, “The Call of Cthulhu,” has led to a literary subculture and a shared mythos employed by Lovecraft’s successors. Despite this presence of religion in Lovecraft’s work, scholars of religion have paid relatively little attention to Lovecraft and the Cthulhu mythos, with a few notable exceptions. This article offers a close analysis of millennialism within Lovecraft’s thought, especially as expressed in three of his “Cthulhu mythos” stories: “The Call of Cthulhu,” “The Dunwich Horror,” and “The Shadow over Innsmouth.” This article considers Lovecraft’s formative experiences and non-fiction writings so as to contextualize his approach and millennial outlook. Tied to his nativist views of social decline, I argue that Lovecraft expresses in his fiction a peculiar form of millennialism, “anti-millennialism,” which entails the reversal of traditional millennialism, offering no hope in a collective salvation, but rather expectation that the imminent future would bring only decline. View Full-Text
Keywords: H.P. Lovecraft; millennialism; declension; nativism; Cthulhu mythos; weird fiction; horror; religion and literature; religion and science fiction H.P. Lovecraft; millennialism; declension; nativism; Cthulhu mythos; weird fiction; horror; religion and literature; religion and science fiction
MDPI and ACS Style

Zeller, B.E. Altar Call of Cthulhu: Religion and Millennialism in H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu Mythos. Religions 2020, 11, 18.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop